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Everything that sucks! And some things that don't.

Nuggets of wisdom amidst incoherent ramblings. You're welcome.

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Ladies and Gentlemen, the President of SPAAAAAAAAAACE!

Christian Heckmann
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Sorry, I'm late. Was out and about until now and didn't have the time to prepare today's post over the course of the last couple of days, so... yeah, better late than never. I played some games lately. Here's what hit the table:



I actually played Campaign Trail twice over the course of the previous week, the first time on Monday (and that was the game which prompted me to yell at slow players for half an hour straight) and then a second time on Wednesday, because while I was immensly annoyed by the first game on Monday, I thought that the game itself was very cool and wanted to get it to the table before the negative memories took hold. Both game were three-player-games, playing in teams with more players sounds cool and I don't think that it'd make the game that much longer (because you're still playing with the same number of cards which act as a timer for the game), but the consensus seems to be that three players is the way to play Campaign Trail. And I have to say, I like it a lot that way. I did win both games (the first one in a very decisive victory, the second one was far closer) so you might want to keep that in mind, but yeah, looks like it was well worth the wait.



There's a lot to like here. The physical quality of the game is absolutely stellar, the decisions feel crunchy, downtime is (usually) short and there's always something cool you can do. I really like how if you've got a card that has a neat permanent ability on it, you can just go "Well, I guess I use my action to get that ability" and then have it for the rest of the game (that is unless someone decides to spend an action to "sabotage" you, having you get rid of your ability). I'm not a hundred percent sure about the amount of take that that can be in the game (when played with the dirty politics cards at least) but in my two games, it never felt overly mean. I mean, sure, it basically is, but then again, this is an area control game, so one-upping the other players is what you do pretty much all of the time. What might be considered a problem by some is the fact that basically, you're fighting all the way through. I don't want to say that it's impossible to gain a certain foothold but generally speaking, the whole game is just a succession of interwoven tug-of-wars and it's only over when it's over. Then again, isn't Twilight Struggle basically the same? And yes, the game has quite a Twilight Struggle-ish feel, even though since you can't use every card to spread your influence everywhere, it tends to feel more dynamic all the way through. Oh, and a final negative: The board can get cluttered badly. But that said, I like it a lot and feel like I'm gonna get many more plays out of that one.



Since we were already in the perfect configuration after our game of Campaign Trail, we decided to play two games of Trieste. I had only played City Guard up until now (quite successful, I might add), it was time to try out the other guilds. At first, I tried my hand at the merchants' guild and almost pulled off a victory but failed at the last moment (due to a slight miscalculation). The City Guard won in the end while the Thieves failed at anything substantial. Afterwards I played the Thieves' Guild and almost made it once more but failed again at the last moment and had to admit defeat to the Merchant's Guild. Both games were pretty close, though, and quite fun.



Five games in, I don't necessarily see any imbalances. It is a delicate game to play, sure, because the players have to keep each other in check, but that's part of the appeal to me. I really like the game. It's quick, it's pretty, the design of the three factions is ingenious and pulling off a clever combo or something like that feels very empowering. Sure, the stars might align from time to time and hand a landslide-victory to one of the players, but the game is twenty minutes or so, so you probably won't have lost that much time. Its three-player-only nature makes it quite restrictive to get to the table, but I really like this one. And there really isn't anything like it out there.



I hadn't played Allegiance: A Realm Divided in a while but when D. and me were waiting for the third player to arrive on Thursday, he was like "Well, we could play a game of Allegiance: A Realm Divided in the meantime" and why should I say no to that? He played the Ranger, I chose the Ninja, so the game turned a bit bluff-tastic both ways. He came out on top, though. I took the bait one time too often and took too many risks. I basically swallowed two turns worth of attacks without fighting back because I wanted to rush to my level 4 ability. And once I unlocked it (and could have dumped my whole hand in order to draw twelve elite units and play one of them at no cost), D. used his ability to make all of his units invulnerable to my abilities for a turn. That sucked. I lost the game on the next turn.



Ansatsu, the Silent Blade, is a really fun character to play and probably quite competitive if played well. It wasn't necessary for me to engage in this all-or-nothing-tactics but we had to wrap up the game quickly anyway, so I thought I might as well. But yeah, Alena Bellamy, the Ranger, is also a force to be reckoned with. Her traps can be absolutely devestating and you pretty much need a huge force and a bit of luck to avoid them. I think I'd like to try playing her soon. Allegiance: A Realm Divided is still a brilliant game and an absolute blast to play and I'm super-glad to own it. If you get the chance to check it out, do so. It's great. I'm talking to you, Dumon and TripleThr3at.



So once we were three, we decided to give Empires of the Void II a whirl. Here's a short preface: Red Raven provided me with a review-copy of this game. I don't think that that'd cause any (more) biases (then I already held anyway) to me, but... don't say I didn't tell you.
Empires of the Void had been on my wishlist for quite some time, mostly because it promised to be a 4X-space-game that doesn't take all day and also because it looked really good. I never played it but when the successor was released, I thought to myself that perhaps I should just skip that one and jump right into the second one. I somehow missed the Kickstarter but as said, the game found its way into my household otherwise. And after my first game, I'd say it's good. Potentially really good. I'm not entirely sure, I'd have to play it again in order to further assess that (which I plan on doing), but yeah, I've got a good feeling about this one. It's a pretty game with cool components that are simply fun to fiddle around with, it has mostly intuitive rules, promises a high level of (meaningful) variability from game to game yet doesn't sacrifice the overall-strategy... I think. As said, it's hard to judge stuff like that with certainty after a single game, especially one where I did extraordinarily bad. Final scores were 54:51:35, if I remember correctly, with me coming in last place.



Why was I so very bad? Well, mostly because in the beginning, I had a hard time wrapping my head around the moment to moment gameplay. Not because it's excessively complex, but because it is an efficiency-game where you're at the mercy of your opponents. The "Scythe but everybody uses the same pawn"-action-selection-mechanism can be a curse and a blessing at once. If you're prepared for what your opponents are probably going to choose (which shouldn't be too hard, there's a total of five actions available and one can hardly be called even that), you can do cool combos that give you loads of points. If you mess up (which is what I mostly did), you have a hard time getting anything done. But then again, if you fail at stringing your actions together in a sensible way, it's probably your own fault, because except for the cards of the other players, everything's out in the open for you to see, why didn't you prepare for what your right neighbor was obviously going to do on his turn you moron? Erm... sorry, didn't mean to be rude. But yeah, it works very well, has little downtime, is fun to play and has a lot of crunchy decisions. I love how there's actually just four-and-a-half actions available but they manage to give such a wide decision space (although yeah, sure, with the "card action"... err... action, it's really no wonder that you can do such a wide range of different things). I also love how the game manges to tie together the 4X-empire-management-stuff with the more personal feeling "Fly through space and have adventures"-stuff. It feels a lot like a combination of the aforementioned Scythe (action selection and combat resolution) and Ryan Laukat's very own Islebound (conquering stuff, having adventures, resource management, etc.) and I like it quite a bit and think that I will like it even better given time and plays. Any negatives? Well, some of the rules are laid out a bit vague (and why would you clarify some of the abilities only on the backs of the player boards?), there is a certain amount of luck and randomness present in the game and parts of it are kind of fiddly and/or harder to grasp (influence vs. control, the amount of special abilities that intersect at any given moment, etc.). But as said, it holds a lot of promise and I really want to get this to the table again soon, mostly because now that I've got a game of this under my belt, I'd be a lot better at it in the future. I hope. I'll report back.



On Friday, I got wound up in another game of NMBR 9, using the NMBR 9: Starting Tiles for the very first time. It was interesting, I don't know if it was due to the influence of those tiles or simply luck, but I managed to pull off the highest score I have ever seen in a game of NMBR 9. I scored a total of 112 points. Which, scientifically speaking, qualifies as "pretty darn good", if I'm not mistaken.



NMBR 9 is a mighty fine game. Not mind-blowing, exceptional, super-duper-awesome or anything like that, but yeah, just really fun and nice. I haven't gotten to acquiring a second copy to build an eight player mega version and I haven't gotten a hold of the promo-stuff myself yet, but having played with the starting tiles, now, I think I should redouble my efforts in that regard.



Hey, have you heard? A German version of Clank! In! Space! has just been released. It's called Klong! Im! All!. That's the same name I first proposed nine months ago. No, I didn't receive anything for that. But I like to think that it was I who planted that idea in the heads of the executives over at Schwerkraft Verlag. Then again, it is a super-obvious title. Still, where's my check?
Anyway, K.'s dad S. bought the German version and wanted to play it. I think the two games we engaged in today were the first times that I played any of the Klong!-games with four players. And it's pretty tough that way. On the first try, all of us perished in Lord Eradicus' ship (both me and S. a single space away from safety). The second time, I pulled off an extraordinary move once I had both halves of the pass-key (basically going in via railway or whatever that thing is, grabbing the twenty point artifact and leaving the same way I came before it could be blocked) and easily cruised to victory with a score of 106 points against the other players' 89 and 39 (seriously, what?). K. didn't make it out.



Klong! Im! All! is still very good as well. With four players, downtime can be a bit problematic (or at least that's how it felt to me). I think in that constelation, I'd rather play the original Klong!. But it was still fun. I think it's time to finally check out the expansion, that sounds like it has some really neat things included.
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Reviewing... Thor: The Dark World

Christian Heckmann
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Personally, I have a rather narrow definition of the term "fan". To me, being a fan of something means being excited for every output of that... "thing" you're a fan of, regardless of context or further details (which makes it kind of hard to be a fan of a specific piece of media, I guess). And going by that definition, I consider myself a fan of exactly five things: My Dying Bride, Clive Barker, the Megami Tensei-franchise, the games by the Emperors of Eternal Evil and the MCU. And I would like to talk about the last one of those today. I had planned to do an MCU-retrospective of some kind for some time now (and I'll perhaps do so once Endgame has dropped and the first arc of the project is completed), but today, I want to talk about a very specific film I recently re-watched.



The first two Thor-movies are probably the most maligned in the whole MCU (besides Iron Man 2 and perhaps The Incredible Hulk), with the second one, Thor: The Dark World, holding the lowest metascore of all the movies set in that universe. It's still not bad, it sits comfortably at a 54/100 (and of course, things like this absolutely don't matter), but it's usually found at the top of lists like "Worst MCU-movie" or "Most underwhelming MCU-movie" or something like that, so... yeah, that's not good. I remember liking it when I did an MCU-catch-up-marathon in 2017. I mean, I wasn't blown away or anything like that, but I wouldn't have lumped it in with the worst of 'em (for the record, the very worst is Iron Man 2 and I consider that one still "alright"). But back then, I wasn't that fond of Thor in general yet. I liked his first solo-movie, even though it was kind of flawed, trying to be three movies in one, not managing to sufficiently fill any one of them and eschewing all of the cosmic possibilities that come with the property in favor of a (admittedly pretty good) action sequence in a small town in New Mexico. But after it, Thor's character development from arrogant upstart to humble defender of the weak was pretty much completed, so where could the second movie go from there? Well, in light of how the character was treated in Thor: Ragnarok and Avengers: Infinity War respectively (a portrayal that has vaulted him to the top of many people's list of favorite Avengers), how does his second solo-outing hold up?

Pretty good. As said, I liked the movie before, but having grown fond of Thor as a character over the course of the subsequent movies helps tremendously. And to be fair, you can already see shades of the guy he becomes in Thor: Ragnarok in this one. People often lament that this movie is too dark, too serious, and while I agree that yes, some really heavy stuff happens in this one (even though Coulson's death in Avengers and the generally darker tone of Iron Man 3 might have de-sensitized fans of the franchise a bit at that point), I don't think that that's a problem. The serious scenes are well realized and there's enough levity in between those to make up for them (and the movie contains one of the funniest scenes and best cameos in all of the MCU-movies, I'm speaking of Loki's second disguise, of course... plus, the scene where Thor has to take the subway back to the showdown after some portal-hopping mayhem is an absolute classic as well), so kudos, Alan Taylor, you did good in that regard.

But the movie has many more strengths. The showdown in particular is one of the more imaginative ones in the whole franchise, the action-scenes are (with a few exceptions) generally really good and feel weighty, the film is one of the best looking Marvel has ever put out and for the first time in the franchise, it really shows the more cosmic side of the Marvel Universe and the effects and designs are really good (at times, the whole thing feels a bit like a test-run for ideas that were further expanded upon in Thor: Ragnarok). Plus it has a kickass soundtrack and Tom Hiddleston is amazing in this one. I also don't get the flak Christopher Eccleston catches for portraying Malekith. Sure, he's no Loki or Vulture or Killmonger (and especially no Thanos, but then again, who is?) but he isn't any worse than Whiplash, Ronan or God forbid Kaecilius. Plus Eccleston is quite good in this role, believably portraying this very strange being so far removed from pretty much all other life in the universe. In general, I'd rate him as an "Yeah'salright" and don't think that he brings down the movie in any way.

Sure, some things could have been better. I'm not a hundred percent satisfied with Natalie Portman in this one (she was reportedly quite pissed about the fact that her favored director Patty Jenkins was dropped and therefore didn't really give the film her all), the way her character has been removed in between this one and Ragnarok doesn't help things either (although it lead to another very funny scene in Ragnarok...) and... I feel like the relationship between her and Lady Sif was a bit mishandled (because there really ISN'T a relationship, they share an ambivalent glance and then that's pretty much it). Ah well, what can you do?

Bottom line, on second viewing, I enjoyed Thor: The Dark World immensly. It is an imaginative film, a well-made one with great performances by Chris Hemsworth and Tom Hiddleston, it is funny, it handles the more serious scenes well, it feels weighty and most of all, it is very entertaining throughout. Sure, Ragnarok is better, I'm not gonna debate that. But looking back at this one, I feel like people were too hard on it. If you haven't watched it in a while and liked the direction Thor's character went in in more recent movies, give it another shot, you might be surprised.

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Sat Mar 23, 2019 7:00 am
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A thousand games later...

Christian Heckmann
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Hooray, I've reached another milestone. I've been keeping an eye on this one for quite some time but it was kind of hard to actually define when I hit it, because the Geek seems to be a bit daft in some regards. See, when I check out my logged plays by games, I still have only played 999 unique games (or 998 if expansions are excluded, because how the hell else are you gonna log plays of Dice Masters?), but when I check my "collection" and filter for only games I have played, there is one more. So I almost missed this one. You might have already guessed it if you have mastered summation (or have just read the title of this post), but:

Last night, I logged a play for my 1000th unique game. And it was...



Yes, Empires of the Void II. A session report (and a post about the newest additions to my collection, including this beauty and something quite BIG) is coming soon.

So yeah, sure, I have probably played my thousandth game before that because I haven't logged every single play of every single game (especially considering that I already played a lot of games as a child that I can't even remember), but it's still a reason to celebrate, if you asked me. And it only took me... eight and a half years. Kind of. Sort of. Eh... anyway, here's to the next thousand games. And may I reach that figure faster than before!

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Fri Mar 22, 2019 7:00 am
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Top Five Thursday: Biggest problems with awesome games

Christian Heckmann
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Alas, where there's light, there's also shadow. Two weeks ago, I talked about great things, awesome things, things that get me excited about board games. Today, I wanna talk about problems. "But you said, this was gonna be a positive segment", I hear you clamor. Yeah, well... it is. That's why I'll focus on problems in awesome games today, problems that don't hold those five games back from being my favorite games of all time, but problems that nevertheless persist. So... this is a good thing? Ah well, we'll see. Anyway, I call today's topic...

Top Five Thursday: Biggest problems with awesome games


I've pretty much given everything I've got to say about today's feature away in the previous paragraph, so... yeah, after reading through my Top 50 over the course of the last few months, you should know by now which five games are my most favorite of all time. But every last one of those carries a fatal flaw. Well, not that fatal. But a flaw nonetheless. And today, I'm gonna unearth those. So without further ado, let's get to it...


#5: A Study in Emerald is easy to tank



I love the first edition of Martin Wallace's A Study in Emerald (as you should know) but even I have to admit that it is a very, very fragile game. A single player who just isn't into it that much or gets frustrated or perhaps just overlooks something can put the game into a fatal downward spiral. And the problem is, you'll probably not be able to see it coming until it happens. I've played absolutely bizarre games of this, games that made me question my faith in the human race or (fittingly enough) my own sanity. But the good ones make it oh so worth it...


#4: Scythe is beginner unfriendly



Oh, so you wanna play a game of Scythe? Great. Have you played before? No? Ah, too bad. Prepare to be crushed then. Yes, I'm pretty good at Scythe, thanks for asking. Good enough to either having to constantly coach a newcomer I'm playing against or crushing them mercilessly. There were more innocent times, back when the game was new, when all of us were learning it at the same time. But nowadays, if it's your first game, you will loose. And it probably won't even be close.


#3: Cthulhu Wars is repressively big



Sorry. Anyway, I love Cthulhu Wars. But I don't play it all that often. Not because it's too complex or too epic for a usual game night. No. It's a very streamlined, straightforward, mid-length game. But it is just too friggin' big. The box, I mean. I can't fit the core-box into most bags and don't get me started on all of the expansions. I want to play the game, but I just can't justfiy physically getting it to the venue most of the time. And that's a shame.


#2: Cave Evil is a mess



An absolutely fantastic mess, sure, but a mess nonetheless. By any right, this game shouldn't be half as good as it is. It's complex, random, fiddly, visually muddled, long, doesn't really have a sweet-spot when player-count is concerned and tends to spill all over the table no matter how hard you try to keep things tidy. It's just that kind of game. I mean, look at the cover, did you expect anything else? But between all of these things, it's just such a bold, charming mess of a game that I can't help but love it. Please, never change, Mat, Jochen and Nate.


And #1: Doomtown: Reloaded's customizability makes it hard to get to the table



It's probably the bane of every customizable card game out there that isn't Magic: The Gathering. The player-base makes or breaks the game's longevity. That's not to say that I don't think that Doomtown: Reloaded is the best game ever anymore. It of course still is. But... I haven't played it since November. I want to, sure. But getting it to the table is hard. Sure, I have more than a dozen decks ready to play, so if you come over, we could play a game or two, but playing with someone else's deck just isn't that fulfilling for most people. And I don't have any opponents owning the game themselves at the moment, so... yeah, it's hard. Not so hard that my love for the game would decrease, but... hard nonetheless.

And that's that, the five biggest problems with the five most awesomest games out there. Fret not, in two weeks' time there'll be another topic that won't appear as phoned in as this one (I'm sorry, time is short at the moment). Hope you enjoyed reading this nonetheless. Thanks for that and see you soon.

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Thu Mar 21, 2019 7:00 am
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Hey! Hey, you there! No, the other one. Yes, you!

Christian Heckmann
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Are you a slow player? Do you suffer from AP or generally take longer to finish a game than other people? Then you might want to sit down, because a) I'm probably gonna say some not so nice things and b) we really need to talk. No, I'm not mad at you. Well... actually, I am. Not necessarily at YOU personally, just at... y'know, "you" in general. The nebulous mass of slow players YOU belong to. Because YOUR slowness is actively hampering my enjoyment of board games. And that's a problem, mate.

I've been debating whether I should really write this article for quite some time now, pondering the pros and cons, thought about the fact that I already touched on some of the issues in previous posts, scrapped it multiple times because it didn't seem productive to me to yell at a quite specific group of people for half an hour or so because of something they probably aren't even to blame for, because they didn't choose to be slow players or overly analytical types that can't help but take in all of the possibilities and have a hard time deciding on one of them. BUT THEN IT HAPPENED AGAIN! On Monday, we played a three-player-game of Campaign Trail and while the actual "session report" (SCNR) and thoughts and stuff will follow in another post, let me just say that in theory, I really liked it and think that it's probably a really good game if played under the right circumstances. But our game took roughly three hours. That's not that bad in itself. It is though, if you consider that a single player hogged more than half of that time with his turns and that had that player played as quickly as us other two guys, we could have probably finished the game in under two hours. It is, if you realize that this is actually a pretty quick game, where on your turn, you choose one of your cards, play it, take an action connected to that card and are done, though at one point, I looked at the clock and noticed that said player was agonizing over which of his five friggin' cards to play for almost ten minutes.

I know that I might be a bit of an oddity, I am at least in my gaming-circles, because, without wanting to brag, I am a very fast player. If I play, I am usually completely focused on the game. I don't do anything on the side, I don't think about anything else, if my turn comes around, I usually know what I want to do and I do it efficiently. And if I don't, I tend to vocalize that fact (which some might find annoying in itself) and then decide on something else in a reasonable timeframe. And if you're wired differently, that's not a problem, I get that different folks find enjoyment in different things and that you might be in the hobby for other reasons, that you might want to socialize on the side or don't want to be pressured into playing at top-speed, that you want to do things at your pace and that I should perhaps relax because it's just a game and all of us are trying to have fun. But that's the point: I'm not having fun watching you leisurely making a move at snail pace. I'm not having fun having to bring you up to speed about what happened in between your turns. I'm not having fun while you're agonizing over which of your five friggin' cards to play for ten minutes straight.

Contrary to how many of my posts (or even some of my actual words on game night) might sound like, it's not that I want to rush games to completion just so that I can play more different games, that I can brag in the future about how many games I have played. It's just that to me personally, game length and the pace of a game can have a very serious impact on my enjoyment of the game in general. A game that can be absolutely brilliant when it lasts for twenty minutes can be terrible if I'm forced to play it for an hour. A game that can be really good when played in an hour can be torturing when it lasts three. I have lost track of how many probably good games I have never gotten to the table again because I tried it for the first time with one of YOU and every shred of goodness was eclipsed by all of the seconds and minutes where I stared at the blank wall, trying not to scream while I was waiting for YOU to finally decide on which action to pick, which card to play, which one of the two absolutely obvious things to do. But just going by the times that my desire to like a game outdid the bad aftertaste that the first session left in my mouth and where I afterwards realized that this IS actually a brilliant game - if I don't play it with YOU - this happened probably quite often. And that's the main problem. Not only are YOU diminishing my acute enjoyment, you're also permanently tarnishing games for me.

Look, being self-aware about it and laughing it away doesn't help. Sure, it might be more preferable to sulking around short-term, but I'd rather you'd not revel in catering for the running-joke in the gaming circle by reminding everyone that you're the slow one in a tongue-in-cheek way. I'd rather you'd do something about it. Because game time is precious and you're wasting everybody's. And I don't want to be the guy to tell you that I don't want to sit at the same table as you, especially not if I like you on a personal level, if I think that you're a great human being and connect to you very well besides the gaming table. But I will do so. Because I don't wan't to sacrifice my own entertainment just to entertain you. So do something about it. No, I don't know what exactly, it's not my responsibility to show you the way. You need to figure this out. And you really should, if you want to make life better for pretty much everybody you play with. Thanks.

Well, I feel kind of better now, because that wieghed heavily on my mind for quite some time now. Oh, and if you're not a slow player... never mind.

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Wed Mar 20, 2019 7:00 am
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'tis the Feudum of the Elder Gods, I'm afraid...

Christian Heckmann
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Oh boy, here we go again. Me taking a stab at another highly anticipated, well regarded Kickstarter game that I didn't even necessarily want to play. Because that wen't so friggin' well last time(s). Ahem...



Feudum, eh? Not necessarily my style of game. I don't have anything against long games. I don't have anything against heavy games. It's the long, heavy games that I am a it weary of (and the notion that that's a category the game could fit into discouraged me from investigating it further back when it was on KS, even though I liked it optically). But Dumon wanted to play this one on Saturday, so I pulled myself together and agreed to come over. I read the rules beforehand and was mostly like "Hum, that's a lot of stuff you can do, but where's the actual game?". Game preparations took some time. The game was already set up when I arrived but we still went over all of the rules, mostly because the third player D. (not one of those you already "know"... I should really reconsider my naming conventions, things are getting complicated) hadn't read them. Interestingly enough, the game itself didn't take as long as I had anticipated. I mean, all of us know how accurate length-estimates her on the Geek are. If a game's page says "80 to 180 minutes", there's a good chance that at least for the first game, things will take quite a bit longer. But at the end of the day, our three player game lasted for only three and a half hours, including teaching. That's not nothing, but it could have been far worse. And you know what? I enjoyed the game. Like... quite a bit. Crazy, huh?



I'm not too sure the three-player-format is optimal for Feudum and our game was also probably very uncharacteristic. Nobody built a feudum and there was only a single instance of combat (where one player went up against the mermaid pinning one of his units), our dominion over the guilds was quite balanced (everybody was in competition with both other players over a guild and was the undisputed ruler of a third one) and most of the time we were just optimizing our positions on the board without stepping on each others' toes. I mean, there was quite a bit of interaction but it was more or less of the amicable kind, which is rather unusual for the game, I understand. It took me a while to get the hang of the resource-management part of the game ("Oh, right, there's this harvest-card... what did that one do? HOLY CRAP, all of my resource troubles are over!") but the other two players didn't really have a watertight game plan either, so when the game ended, I won with 136 points. Is that good?
As said, I do like Feudum, even though I have some reservations. It is fiddly. The constant assessing and re-assessing of the guild-power-levels is a bit problematic (we had self-made "guild power boards" set up next to the main board which helped tremendously but it was still easy to forget to push around the respective markers when we did something that changed something there), the board, while quite pretty, isn't all that convenient to use (more than once I was surprised to find out that no, there is no connection between these two spaces here, especially the waterway-symbolism is quite terrible) and while it's only a small part of the game, I find the randomness that enters the game via the resource-bag, the epoch-tiles (to a certain extent) and the card-deck to be quite strange. I mean, it's a very thinky, highly strategic game, these sources of randomness just don't gel that well with the rest of the design.
But apart from this, as said, I had fun and I would gladly play Feudum again. It's neither as long nor as complex as I had feared it would be, it looks good, there's a lot of stuff to explore and there's a lot of stuff in it that is just really fun. So yeah, color me surprised, for now, this is actually a pretty good game.



Since Feudum hadn't taken all that long, we decided to play some more games afterwards. The first one was the deduction-dungeon-crawler Misty Ruins. My first play of this one was marred by loads of rule-uncertainties and some super slow players. Now, with three people and most ambiguities eliminated, the thing should go like clockwork, right? Well... it did. Turns were short, most of the actions made more sense, the deduction was fun and the game didn't overstay its welcome. What keeps me from wholeheartedly recommending the thing is the fact that it can be awfully random, which is a real problem in a deduction game. Dumon seemed especially frustrated because he almost invariably only drew monster-tiles and without a wider range of weapons, he wasn't able to deduce all that much, except for "Well duh, looks like I can't beat this dragon with my bare hands, thanks for the info!". I on the other hand had randomly picked a weapon that was incredibly good for my character at the beginning of the game and was frying monsters left and right. I had no idea who I was by the end of the game (because early in the game, for some reason, I had already eliminated the character I actually was) but I had gained so much gold by killing monsters that I would have almost won regardless (I think I lost by two gold).



I think I want to like Misty Ruins more than I really do, because the concept is novel (on the other hand, the game is nine years old, so perhaps not that novel after all?) and actually kind of makes thematic sense, not something that all that many deduction games can boast (even though I still don't know why I can't... I don't know, look down my own body to find out whether I've got a tail or something like that). But yeah, the randomness is a real problem. It's still fun, though, and pretty quick, so that's not an ultimate dealbreaker, then again, I'd love for the game to be better...



Next up was Fate of the Elder Gods, another one I had kept on the shelf for a long time after a first game that had overstayed its welcome hard. And another one that prooved that that's not necessarily always how the game goes, because we managed to pull this thing off in roughly sixty minutes or so (perhaps a bit more than that). And that's good, because Fate of the Elder Gods was another one I really wanted to like but didn't because of a subpar first experience. There's still some things that don't necessarily sit that well with me. Take-that in this game can be quite harsh, the "roll for control"-rule is really weird, luck of the draw can mess you over, as can the other players just by chance, should the guy or girl to your right constantly decide to go to the locations where you want to go. But there's also a lot to like.



For one, it looks really good. Yeah, sure, the board is quite abstract and the cultists and investigators are a weird clone-brigade but the miniatures are great and chunky and the sheer mass of those helps tremendously. The artwork is also good. Gameplay is fast and fun, the huge deck of multi-use-spell-cards holds so much promise, as does the deck of artifacts and the great variety of cults and monsters. Yeah, sure, all of this makes the game far more tactical than strategic, you'll most likely play the hand you're dealt and go with the flow instead of deciding exactly on how to win the game once you hold your lodge-sheet in hands, but for a game this quick, that's not a problem. So yeah, cool, I feel kind of reconciled with this game and look forward to bringing it forth again soon. Perhaps I should also add it to the list of games available for Monday Night Multiplayer Solitaire? Hm, the poll here on the Geek suggests that the solo-mode isn't that good. Then again, only one way to find out, right?



The last game of the night was Asking for Trobils and even though we misplayed one rule (we only had as many Trobil-cards face up as the number of players, instead of number of players plus one, which in hindsight didn't really make any sense), it was great fun. Plus also super quick. My turn? Well, I guess I'm gonna put one of my ships over there or take them all back, NEXT! With three, the "downtime" was sometimes so short that people whose turn it was held up the game because they didn't realize that it was their turn again. So yeah, I suppose that the game will probably be playable alright even with up to seven players. Sure, it's super light, you just gather the stuff you need to grab a Trobil card and if you've got what you need, you just do so. Plus now and then, you can customize your ships a bit, perhaps take a Riff-Raff-card... It's all quite basic. But that doesn't mean that it isn't fun.



The component quality of the second edition is really good and the ship-molds are different enough so that it isn't even a problem that pretty much everything in the game is orange. And while hardly challenging, the central gameplay-loop is gratifying enough to keep you entertained for the short time the game takes (our game including setup and teaching took roughly sixty minutes... we played the "shorter" variant suggested in the rulebook though). So all in all, this one's quite good as well. Fast, pretty, little downtime, simply fun, what's more to ask? Especially after a game as involving as Feudum.

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Tue Mar 19, 2019 7:00 am
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Monday Night Multiplayer Solitaire #19: Castles Of Mad King Ludwig

Christian Heckmann
Germany
Mainz
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Back to building stuff. A castle this time. A very strange castle. For a very strange person. One of the Castles of Mad King Ludwig, if you will...



This one's gonna be a bit more complicated, because of the way the game works. And it's all because of that darn bonus for completed bedrooms. In other games, I can tell you in which order tiles or cards will come up, but not this time, because you might complete a bedroom at any given point in the game and then, you may examine a stack of tiles and everything goes down the drain. So this post is gonna get a bit bulkier than usual. I'm gonna give you the order of room-cards, the order of tiles in each of the stacks (if you pick one of those up via bedroom-bonus, just shuffle the remaining tiles afterwards and have them randomized that way from now on) plus the order of bonus cards. I'm also gonna provide the tile-names in German and English, because I own the German version and some of them are downright confusing translations... Apart from that, I assume that you know the rules for the solo-game. So here we go.

Setup:

You're gonna start the game with the following two bonus-cards:

All 10 room sizes
Hallways

Room card deck:

Spoiler (click to reveal)
600

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100

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250

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350

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150

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300

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450

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150

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350

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500

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600

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250

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100

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600

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250

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400

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200

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150

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450

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600

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300

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400

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300

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400

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450

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100

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500

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250

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500

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400

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500

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250

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100


100:

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Pink Cabinet/Rosa Kabinett

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Pantry/Vorratskammer

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Larder/Speisekammer

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Cloak Room/Garderobe

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Buttery/Lagerraum

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Lilac Cabinet/Lila Kabinett

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Powder Room/Puderraum


150:

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Sitting Room/Stube

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Flute Room/Flötenzimmer

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Fungus Room/Pilzkeller

Spoiler (click to reveal)
The Hole/Kerker

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Piano Room/Klavierzimmer

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Study/Herrenzimmer

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Parlor/Sprechzimmer


200:

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Dirt Room/Schmutzraum

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Nap Room/Ruheraum

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Anteroom/Vorzimmer

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Utility Room/Hauswirtschaftsraum

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Washroom/Waschraum

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Meat Locker/Kühlraum

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Food Prep Room/Anrichtezimmer


250:

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Gatehouse/Pförtnerhaus

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Oratory/Kapelle

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Sewing Room/Nähzimmer

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Crypt/Gruft

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Billiards Room/Billardzimmer

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Mold Room/Schimmelkeller

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Shed/Schuppen


300:

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Guest Bedroom/Gästezimmer

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Laundry Room/Wäscherei

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Kitchen/Küche

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Dining Room/Speisezimmer

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Tasso Room/Tasso Raum

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Scullery/Spülküche

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Panic Room/Panikraum


350:

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Gallery Of Mirrors/Spiegelsaal

Spoiler (click to reveal)
9 Pin Alley/Kegelbahn

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Salon/Salon

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Train Room/Eisenbahnzimmer

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Upper Hall/Obere Halle


400:

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Grand Bedchamber/Großes Schlafgemach

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Servant's Quarters/Gesindehaus

Spoiler (click to reveal)
French Gazebo/Französischer Pavillon

Spoiler (click to reveal)
East Tapestry Chamber/Östliches Tapisserie Gemach

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Pumpkin Garden/Kürbisgarten


450:

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Dungeon/Verlies

Spoiler (click to reveal)
West Tapestry Chamber/Westliches Tapisserie Gemach

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Armory/Waffenkammer

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Formal Gardens/Prunkgarten

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Drawing Room/Zeichensaal


500:

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Venus Grotto/Venus Grotte

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Secret Lair/Geheimzimmer

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Green House/Gewächshaus

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Forum/Forum

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Hunding's Hut/Hundings Hütte


600:

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Vestibule/Vestibül

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Singers' Chamber/Gesangszimmer

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Stables/Stallungen

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Throne Room/Thronsaal

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Terrace Gardens/Terassengarten


Bonus cards:

Spoiler (click to reveal)
300

Spoiler (click to reveal)
150

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Living

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Corridor

Spoiler (click to reveal)
450

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Food

Spoiler (click to reveal)
350

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Outdoor

Spoiler (click to reveal)
All 8 kinds

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Activity

Spoiler (click to reveal)
250

Spoiler (click to reveal)
100

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Square rooms

Spoiler (click to reveal)
500

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Sleep

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Per two exits

Spoiler (click to reveal)
200

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Downstairs

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Stairs

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Utility

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Round rooms

Spoiler (click to reveal)
400

Spoiler (click to reveal)
600

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Completed rooms

Spoiler (click to reveal)
5000 Mark


Final score:

Spoiler (click to reveal)


69 points


After-game discussion:

Spoiler (click to reveal)
People don't seem to like the solo-version of Castles of Mad King Ludwig very much and I can certainly see where they're coming from. It feels very different from the normal game. Love it or hate it, the master-builder-phase is an integral part of the game and the fact that in a multiplayer-game, things don't progress if people don't want them to (and therefore you can "waste" a turn grabbing money isn't that bad), this is ironically enough a more relaxed game when played competitively. In the solo-game, you only have that many rounds to build your castle (probably eleven, even though I managed to bump it up to 13 through the timely completion of bedrooms) and you have to find ways to get additional money throughout the game. I mostly did so by completing food rooms and using the bonus-actions to just grab 5000 Marks but that didn't work as well as I had hoped. I mean, I managed to build a pretty good castle, sure, but I failed to fulfil the "all ten room sizes"-bonus-card and also didn't make a lot of points from the other ones (I think I got a total of four points from bonus cards). But yeah, I did some cool stuff and the castle looks good. Far better than what I usually build. So I'm pretty content with what I accomplished. Come and beat me, if you dare!


Next week's game is gonna be Habitats (again using a solo-variant that wasn't included in the game, but this one was published by Corné van Moorsel himself, so that's cool). Let's find out what to play the week after...

Poll
Which game should be played in two-weeks' time on Monday Night Multiplayer Solitaire?
  Your Answer   Vote Percent Vote Count
Avenue
17.6% 3
Can't Stop Express
17.6% 3
Cucina Curiosa
5.9% 1
Dr. Eureka
5.9% 1
Limes
52.9% 9
Voters 17
This poll is now closed.   17 answers
Poll created by Harblnger
Closes: Sat Mar 23, 2019 6:00 am


Wow, next week is gonna be the 20th issue of Monday Night Multiplayer Solitaire. That's quite something. Thanks for sticking with me up until now, thanks for reading, playing, voting and thumbing and I'll see you soon.


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Mon Mar 18, 2019 7:00 pm
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Race conditions

Christian Heckmann
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Mainz
Rheinland Pfalz
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Just in case you didn't know, in computer science (and probably some other fields, too) "race conditions" describe the behavior of a system which is dependent on the sequence or timing of uncontrollable events. Like for example if two threads of software run concurrently and whichever finishes first alters the final result of the whole thing. That's a race condition. That has nothing to do with today's topic, but the bi-monthly gaming-meetup on Friday somehow became impromptu-racing-themed, so I found it kind of fitting.



Early in the evening, we played a four-player-game of Automobiles, using the cards recommended for the first game and the Monza track (because Daytona Beach looked boring). I did quite well early on, leading the pack through the first lap, making good use of the red cube I bought with my starting-money. My luck ran out quickly, though. Another player made good use of the Hybrid Engine card and even though some of us tried to counter him, he managed to pull off an impressive lead soon enough. Even though I kind of caught up (a bit), the mismanagement of my wear lead to some kind of wasted turns. In the end, I "finished" third (I didn't really finish, but when the race was over, I was in third position and it would have been unlikely that the player in fourth place would have passed me). Eh, not bad for the first time.



Automobiles is pretty fun. The fact that there's so few different "cards" in the game might turn off some people but I find that there's a certain elegance to the system. The actions we had in our game pretty much covered everything I'd imagine could happen in the game (it's a racing-game after all, there's not really much more to it than driving in a circle until someone wins...) so managing the contents of your bag efficiently is more important than constantly buying new cubes. Which is fine by me (even though I did really poorly on that part). I'm not too sure I like the Hybrid Engine card, I feel like it's one of those where if one player starts to buy cubes of that color, someone else HAS to counter that by buying them as well, effectively cancelling out each other in the process (possibly, it can still work out from time to time), but I might be wrong and there might be pros or cons to all of the cards. As said, it was fun, though. Could have been a bit faster but I guess that could improve with further plays. I mean, once we actually knew what we were doing, turns were pretty quick. I like it. Quite a bit, to be honest.



Next up was another car-racing-game. Kind of. I mean, at its core, Cthulhu 500 is actually just a silly take-that-card-game but it has a racing-theme (and at the end of the game, the player in the lead wins, even though positioning is only considered in relation to the other players) so I'll let it slide. We decided to play the shortened version (shuffle the checkered-flag-card into the bottom half of the deck) because I had heard that the game can sometimes run a bit long otherwise and going over the rules, I reckoned that it's super-random anyway, so a longer game probably wouldn't make the thing more strategic, only... well... longer. So off we went, throwing cards across the table, chucking dice, trash-talking each other... And it was fun. No, really. It is incredibly random and exceedingly silly and the winner will probably be decided by sheer dumb luck instead of tactics or skill, but for what it's worth, the cards are indeed kind of funny and the mechanics don't intrude too much.



I actually won (so it's probably a quite strategic game after all), piloting the Fearrari to victory on "Big Fat Radials Of Flaming Death". How did I do it? Well, I rolled quite well during the passing attempts. And a timely play of the chaos-spell by another player handed me a quite neat hand of cards (the player in front of me in the pack was like "Har har, I've got great cards, next time it's my turn, I'm gonna do something super-awesome" and then someone played the chaos-spell and I was like "Thanks for your great cards, I'm gonna take good care of them"... yes, it's a stupid thing when games allow for something like this, but it's a stupid game after all, so it was kind of fun). I wouldn't want to play it with the actual-length-rules, even with the shortened variant, I felt like it overstayed it's welcome a bit. And... it's not as "playable" as I'd want it to be. There's quite a bit of text on the cards and the graphic-design isn't perfect so it's a bit hard to read. And the game depends on its break-neck pace, so having it slow down because people need to read cards is kind of a problem. But I would be lying if I said that I didn't enjoy my time with Cthulhu 500. And sometimes, that's enough.



Onward to a foot-race. After the success on Monday, I decided to get Bullets and Teeth back to the table. If my mind serves correctly, this was the first time I played it with five players. Aaaaand... I probably like it better with less. It's a bit like with the longer version of Cthulhu 500. I don't see the longer playing time that you're facing with five people as something that inherently improves the game. Nothing really changes over time (well, the horde gets bigger), so a three-player-game usually just feels like the endgame of a five-player-game and that's usually where things get tense. It of course wasn't bad. Even with five people at the table, we're talking a twenty-minute-game, tops. But yeah, I don't really see the advantage of having more players in the game.



Anyway, it was another pretty glorious game. The first player dropped out pretty quickly and thanks to some unlucky teeth-card-draws, the horde became quite overwhelming in no-time again. I was lucky enough to have some Snack-rifice-cards in hand (and not losing them to someone else blindsiding me) and the Panic Room location took care of the rest. Still, it was tense down to the wire. At the end of the game, I was the bait and I couldn't possibly stem the tide. So my last hope was playing Dinner Bell on my last surviving opponent, hoping for the best. The first card didn't bring the desired result and afterwards, the discard-pile had to be reshuffled. One of the eliminated players came forward to do the reshuffling in order to rule out any form of tampering. And then, the second card. A friggin' Scabby Tabby. My opponent became the bait and was immediately devoured. What a finale! What a game! I like it.



So how about a space-race? The next game was Gravwell: Escape from the 9th Dimension, one of my favorite games of all time (number 34, to be precise). It's always great fun even though it usually takes a turn or two until it finally clicks for most people. I don't know if that's what happened this time as well, the other players seemed to "get" it rather quickly, but the first turn was still an unmitigated disaster, with ships just going back and forth in the vicinity of the singularity. Perhaps it was just an unfortunate distribution of cards? I don't know, but things picked up afterwards. The field was quickly separated into two "packs" of two ships (as usually happens for some reason) and even though I was quite confident to pull off a victory, D. made a huge comback and left through the warpgate before anyone could stop him.



I love Gravwell: Escape from the 9th Dimension. It takes all of the chaos and hillarity of grander programming-games and streamlines it into a thirty to forty minute game. Sure, there's not "that much" going on in it, but sometimes, that's not necessary. If a game is incredibly fun (like this one is), it can be more basic in my book. Still, I wished that it could be played with more than four players, because it is a game suitable for a party and in that regard, the maximum player count is quite restrictive. I know I'm repeating myself, but come on, Cory. I need that expansion!



No idea how I'll be able to fit this one in under the motto of the evening, though. What were we racing for? Finding treasures? Shooting bad-guys in the face? Adventure in general? Well, there was quite a bit of running involved, so... yeah. As the last game of the evening, we played Uncharted: The Board Game, a tableau-builder I happen to like more than it has any right to. It turned out rather strange. For some reason, there were hardly any enemies present. I tried to build up a huge weapon-combo but then I was lacking targets to shoot at, so my three pistols mostly sat on the table unused. Atoq Navarro popped up at one point and then was immediately taken down by my arsenal but that was the only moment at which I could really derive a benefit from all of them guns. In the end, I made quite a few points, not least by way of Nathan Drake's ring which feels stupidly overpowered, but S. beat me by a single VP so perhaps it's balanced after all?



I don't know, I don't think that the characters are perfectly balanced at the very least. Next time I think I'm gonna play without special abilities. The possibilities to customize your tableau of cards should be enough to individualize yourself from the other players. But the (perceived) imbalance is not the only thing that Uncharted: The Board Game has going against it. First of all, it's one ugly game. Ingame-pictures from the game were mixed with promo-artwork without any rhyme or reason and it just looks really bad. It also has absolutely nothing to do with its source material. This isn't an epic globetrotting adventure game, it's a pretty abstract tableau builder that uses pictures and lingo from the video games in order to justify the mechanics. And it can be quite random. How was I supposed to know that finding that treasure would lead to an enemy popping up that immediately deals two damage? That's not really cool, no matter how you slice it. I still like the game, though. Yeah, it's quite unthematic but the way the tableau-building works in this one is just really fun. With the limited slots, it really feels quite RPG-ish, like you're actually equipping your character with cool items and abilities to use. And that's always something I tend to like. It most certainly isn't a perfect game. But I like it nonetheless.

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Sun Mar 17, 2019 7:00 am
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I can see clearly now...

Christian Heckmann
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Still a bit preoccupied with university-stuff, so... how about a small slice of life post today? After fixing my previous pair of glasses for a prolonged period of time with superglue after some people decided to take a seat on them, two weeks ago, I finally got around to visiting a local opitamahowajist (© Rich Evans) and getting some new eyewear made. Officially, I only need them while driving, but most of the time, I use my glasses for operating the computer from across the room (I got my computer plugged into the TV in order to use it from the couch and while my visual acuity is over 100 percent - ??? - it's a bit hard to read small text without them glasses that way). So... without further ado, here's a few pics of yours truly with (and without) his new eyewear (plus bandshirt of a long disbanded death metal band - five Geekgold for whomever guesses their name). Enjoy!







There's gonna be more board game related stuff again tomorrow, I promise! See you then.

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Sat Mar 16, 2019 7:00 am
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There is hope yet for humanity...

Christian Heckmann
Germany
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Rheinland Pfalz
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Excuse me if I turn quasi-sociological for a moment again, but there's just something I want to express. And it's the fact that my faith in the human race has been recently renewed. And it's all because of Captain Marvel. Well... not really. But... kind of.



Captain Marvel, the 21st film in the long-running MCU, has been released on March 7th here in Germany and the next day, March 8th, in the USA. I haven't seen it yet, my trip to the cinema with a bunch of friends is planned for March 29th, but it still has managed to do something that pleases me quite a bit.

See, before Captain Marvel was released, a very loud minority (and we now know for a fact that it was indeed a minority) took to the internet to invoke a shitstorm about certain things that leading lady Brie Larson has said during her promo-tours and beyond. Things about more inclusivity and diversity, especially when it comes to the reception of movies. So what she actually said was that different movies are made for different audiences, yet the demographic makeup of movie critics doesn't correspond to the one of the general population (she pointed out that 67% of critics are white males whereas they only constitute 30% of the general population... dunno if that's true, that's just what she said) and that it is problematic to assume that a group that is homogene to such a degree could fairly assess the viewing-experience for the whole of the general population.

A lot of things have been replied to this. From acknowledgement that this is a real issue to dissenting voices that remarked that while potentially true, the condescending tone of Larson's deliberations failed to connect with audiences. Jay and Mike from RedLetterMedia commented that while true, this is a completely insignificant problem, because in the grand scheme of making the world a better place for everyone, "fixing" the biased composition of the contemporary league of film critics isn't really that important. I don't know, in modern times, review-aggregators (as stupid as they are) are at the height of their popularity. People don't care about individual voices anymore, it's all about that aggregated score for some. And a bad score on the "Tomatometer" can seriously hurt a movie's performance.

Anyway, that's not really the point. Brie Larson said something that's probably true, potentially immaterial and was perhaps worded a bit unfelicitous. Well, happens to the best of 'em. Shouldn't be that big of a deal now, should it? It apparently was to some people. Because the aforementioned shitstorm happened. Some very vocal people tried to bring the movie down for its lead's brazenness to attack the status quo and push a feminist agenda and yadda yadda yadda, if you've spent more than ten minutes on the internet in your life, you probably know the drill. Emboldened by their apparent success when it came to punishing Disney for similar offenses in regards to the Star Wars franchise (because the Han Solo movie bombed and that was absolutely a hundred percent due to those people and not perhaps because nobody really knew what to expect from a Han Solo movie and wasn't really clamoring for it and the reported production-troubles of that movie didn't build much confidence either...), they felt confident that they could "do it again", calling for boycotts, spreading the so called "Alita Challenge" on Twitter (for the uninitiated, those people wanted to set an example by calling upon the populace to go see Alita on the first weekend of Captain Marvel's release to teach Disney and Marvel a lesson) and basically spending every waking moment to rail against this movie they hadn't even seen because they felt offended by something that Brie Larson had said once (and is it only me who thinks that those are probably the same people who constantly demand to divorce the art from the artist when it comes to problematic creators behind stuff they like?).

And then, the opening weekend came. And guess what? Not only was Captain Marvel a critical success, it was also a smash-hit at the box office, taking in 455 million dollars over the course of the weekend worldwide. I don't want to get too much into the capitalistic side of things, I am aware of the disconnect between people living in abject poverty and Disney raking in another half billion dollars with a vapid blockbuster movie, I just want to look at this as a sociological success-story. I don't know if and how much I'll like Captain Marvel, I've got a huge man-crush on Clark Gregg's Agent Coulson though and after the devestating finale of the fifth season of Agents Of S.H.I.E.L.D., I think it's gonna be great to see him again, no matter how little of him will be in the movie. And I haven't really been disappointed by any MCU-movie yet (except for Iron Man 2, maybe), but that's beside the point. Captain Marvel has already done good by proving that these hateful people are indeed just a vocal minority and don't have any real power. Perhaps there is hope yet...

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Fri Mar 15, 2019 7:00 am
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