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Dungeons & Dragons 5th Edition Information
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This geeklist stores general information for PBF play of Dungeons & Dragons 5th Edition. I use this to refer players in my PBF games to.
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1. RPG Item: Player's Handbook (D&D 5e) [Average Rating:8.48 Overall Rank:4]
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Rules

To run this adventure, we use the rules specified by the Dungeons & Dragons 5th Edition Player's Handbook (PHB). The Basic Rules in the PHB are freely available through this link: basic rules.

You can use these Basic Rules to answer most of the questions that you have about the game. You can also ask me -- and in the end, the GM decides in all cases anyway.

There are two ways to ask for more information: (1) you can do so in the Out-of-Character (OOC) thread, which is also used for general OOC banter, or (2) you can do so in the In-Character (IC) thread, where the game is played. If you use the IC thread, then surround your question or comment with the tags [*ooc] and [*/ooc] (without the stars). This will show the text in light-grey, like so. However, only do this for short questions/remarks which are tied to the current situation, as we do not want the IC thread to be cluttered up with OOC text.
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2. RPG Item: Double Posts [Average Rating:0.00 Unranked]
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Posts

For posts in the OOC thread, you can use any kind of formatting that you like. Usually players just type and maybe add some bold or italics.

For posts in the IC thread, you might want to be more extensive.

I would like to see a banner at the heading of each post. A banner is a picture with your character's name, with underneath it one or more small lines of text which indicate the most important features of your character, such as your current and maximum hitpoints, your spell slots and which of them have been used, etcetera. I would like you to update this banner every time something changes to those features, e.g., when you get damaged or use a spell. To make a banner and include it easily in your post, please check out the item on Banners below, and the second comment at the bottom of this geeklist (I made this a comment rather than an item so that you can copy from it).

When you describe what you do, you use a regular font. However, when you speak or think, I would like you to use a special, colored font. The most common approach is that you choose one, readable color for this, and type your spoken texts in this color and bold, and your thoughts in this color and italics. Every player should choose a different color.

In general, for spoken text of NPCs I will use bold text within double quotes. I will not show you the thoughts of NPCs. Occasionally I may give an NPC their own color, for instance if the NPC is traveling with the party for a longer time.

You sometimes may wish to use "spoiler" tags in your posts (you can use the small SP button at the top of the editing window). You do this, for instance, when you speak in a language that the other characters do not understand. It is then up to the other characters to decide whether or not they read what you wrote -- they can click on it to see. If it is something that you really do not want them to see and still need to communicate to me, use geekmail.

If you want to use images in your posts, the easiest way is to upload such an image to your personal gallery here on RPGG. The image then has a number (you see this number in the address bar when you click on the image), which you then can use to include the image in a post (you can use the camera icons at the top of the editing window for that).

It helps if you "thumb" posts that you have read (except your own posts, that is impolite), so that everybody knows who is where in reading the thread. This is not a requirement, but it tends to be helpful, especially for the GM.

As for editing posts: if you fix small textual mistakes, you do not need to worry, but if you are making big changes to a posts which already were read by someone, then you better make a new post, or write a new post in the thread stating that you made a change to a previous post. As GM, I sometimes have to "develop" posts over multiple edits; usually I will then put a remark "Post in progress" in red in the post, so that it is clear that the post is not finished yet.

All in all, RPGG is a bit of a barbaric site to use, but very flexible and powerful. You will get used to it.
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3. RPG Item: D&D Character Builder (Classic Edition) [Average Rating:8.04 Overall Rank:46]
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Character Creation

Character creation is a pretty complex business. There is a brief explanation here on the Geek, written by Jim Parkin. However, I suggest that you simply use an online tool to create your character. I use the Orcpub2 character builder (https://orcpub2.com/pages/dnd/5e/character-builder). You will still need the basic rules to do it, and this tool is missing some backgrounds and feats which you may need to add yourself, but all in all it is the easiest way to construct a legal character.

Note that most GMs want you to either use the standard array, or the 27-point buy system to determine your abilities. GMs may also put restrictions on alignments, races, classes, spells, etcetera. Check your GM to find out what is and is not allowed.
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4. RPG Item: D&D Character Builder (Online Edition) [Average Rating:5.58 Overall Rank:7632]
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Character Sheets

You store your character sheet in a separate geeklist.

There is a template available to create your character sheet in the first post in the comment section below (I used the comment section for this rather than an item, as you cannot copy text from an item).

Copy the template text and add an item to the character geeklist (use the "Add Item" button at the bottom of the header). If you select the "Quote" option of the comment you will get an edit window where you can highlight and copy the template body. Remember to remove the quote tags at the bottom and top. Paste the template into the "new" list item (not the comment reply) and make the edits necessary. You can change the formatting if you like, as long as it is well-readable and all information is there.

For an example, see the very last item of this geeklist.
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5. RPG Item: Elven Banner [Average Rating:6.50 Unranked]
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Banners

Here is an example of a header that you can use for your posts in the IC thread:

Velomille, Human Wizard 3
HP 17/17 | Ward 0/9 | AC 12/15 w/MA | SS 13 | SA +5 | PP 14 | Spells lv.1 [ ][ ][ ][ ] lv.2 [ ][ ]

Dialogue
Thought

You can put the code for such a banner in a separate document, from which you copy it when you need it. However, the easiest way to include such a header in a post, is to put it in the quickbar which you see at the top of the page. Choose "Edit", and you see a list of entries for the quickbar. In a cell to the left, put a description such as "header". In the cell to the right of it, put the following:

javascript:{emoticon(document.MESSAGEFORM.body,'XXXXXX')};void(0);

In place of the XXXXXX, put the header text that you want. I have displayed a banner in the second comment to this geeklist, where you can quote it to see how it is built up. Just adapt it -- you do not need to stick to the items which I put in the header, though HP, AC, spell slots, and limited-use abilities are very useful. Note that every newline in the header text you should replace with \n, as the header must be all on one line.

If you want a banner for your posts, you can make your own (I did; it is very ugly), or ask the Banner Makers Guild to make one for you.

Once you have prepared the quickbar (and saved it), you can simply click on the quickbar entry when you have a new post open, and it will copy the header into it.

If for some reason you cannot include a banner in your post (e.g., you are on your phone and are not working with the quickbar), then at least put the name of your character in bold at the top of the post.
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6. RPG Item: Ability Score [Average Rating:8.00 Unranked]
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Ability Checks

Most of D&D 5th edition revolves around using a 20-sided dice. Not only do they control combat, but, in social situations, also the use of your skills. These represent what your character is good at... and not so good at.

You'll roll the d20 (a 20-sided die) and add an appropriate modifier. For instance, you might want to roll your Insight skill to see if someone is telling the truth. You'd roll the d20 and add your modifier for that skill -- it might be a positive, which is good, or a negative. Or a 0, which means you roll a d20 and hope for the best.

You'll be comparing the result of your roll against a number. Higher is always better in these cases. This number you're aiming for is called a Difficulty Class.

Here's a chart that gives you an idea of what you're hoping to roll.

Task Difficulty DC

Very easy = 5
Easy = 10
Medium = 15
Hard = 20
Very hard = 25
Nearly impossible = 30

Note that if you roll 1 on the d20, regardless any further modifiers, the check is an automatic fail. On the other hand, if you roll 20, regardless any further modifiers, the check is an automatic success. Of course, it is up to the GM to determine what fail and success actually mean.

Sometimes, you'll roll opposed checks. Using the Insight example again, a person who is lying might try to roll their Deception skill versus your Insight. Whoever gets higher wins.

There are also things called Passive checks. Passive Perception is the best example. If you're walking down the street, it doesn't make sense that your character is constantly looking around every corner to make sure that the party isn't ambushed (which would mean a constant Perception check). Instead, you'd use your Passive Perception -- this is 10 + your Skill modifier. This is always "on." Passive checks are only applicable for a handful of skills, and they usually happen behind the scenes (as in, I'm keeping an eye on things and I'll let you know if your character notices something).

An example for absolute clarity: Suppose that you try to entertain another character by telling a joke. In the text for the adventure, it might say that you need a DC15 Performance check to make the person laugh (or, if the text says nothing, I as GM may decide that you need to make that check). You roll a d20 and add your Performance skill modifier, e.g., d20+3. If the result is 15 or higher, you succeed and the person is entertained. If you roll lower, you fail. What succeeding and failing entails, is under control of the GM.

The text above I copied for a large part from a post by Jason Panella. Thank him for the extensive explanation.
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7. RPG Item: Tests of Skill [Average Rating:5.00 Unranked]
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Skills

A question that often pops up when discussing Ability Checks and choosing which skill to use, is: "what do skills actually entail?" It is not always clear when a particular skill should be used, so if you are in doubt, ask me.

There is information on the different skills in the Player Handbook (PHB; p.174-179) and the Basic rules (p.58-62). In brief:

Acrobatics: Staying on your feet in tricky situations.
Animal handling: Calming an animal, understanding animal intentions.
Arcana: Lore of spells, eldritch symbols, magic items, and the planes.
Athletics: Jumping, climbing, swimming.
Deception: Lying, misleading, disguising.
History: Lore of historical events, people, civilizations, and wars.
Insight: Understanding a creature's motivations and intentions.
Intimidation: Influencing through overt threats.
Investigation: Deductive reasoning.
Medicine: Stabilizing a person who is dying, diagnosing an illness.
Nature: Lore of terrain, plants, animals, and weather.
Perception: Detecting the presence of someone or something.
Performance: Entertaining.
Persuasion: Influencing through social skills.
Religion: Lore of deities, rites, prayers, holy symbols, and cults.
Sleight of hand: Legerdemain, manual trickery, pickpocketing.
Stealth: Concealing, sneaking.
Survival: Following tracks, hunting, avoiding natural dangers.

The rules say that instead of making a check yourself, you can assist another party member in making the check. You can do that as long as you can make the check yourself. If you assist, the other party member makes the roll with advantage. This entails that she rolls two d20s, and uses the result of the highest one. There are other ways in which you can get advantage, based on the story, or, in case of combat, enemy features.

The rules also say that common sense should be applied in determining whether or not a check can be made with assistance. For instance, if a check of knowledge should be made (e.g., History, Arcana, Nature), it makes sense that "two know more than one," therefore advantage could be granted. However, when picking a lock, it does not make sense that two characters try to pick a lock simultaneously.

Usually it makes little difference whether one character assists another to grant advantage, or two characters both try to pass the check by themselves. I would say that if you want to assist another character to make a check with advantage, you should roleplay it, i.e., describe how you assist the character.

You may also have disadvantage on skill checks. This entails that you roll two d20s and use the lowest roll. In particular, this happens with Stealth checks when a character is wearing certain armors (padded armor, scale mail, half plate, ring mail, chain mail, splint, and plate; see the PHB or Basic Rules to find out more on that). Usually, disadvantage happens due to status effects (e.g., being poisoned) or enemy actions. If a character has both advantage and disadvantage on a check, they cancel each other out. Note that you cannot have more than a single advantage or a single disadvantage on a check.
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8. RPG Item: Dice [Average Rating:9.09 Unranked]
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Rolling Dice

To roll dice, we use the GeekRoller, which allows you to make die rolls in posts.

Here is an example that I made up: Let's say that I want to show that I am rolling a History check to see if my character knows if the McGuffin she has been hired to find is really an ancient artifact. My History skill is +3. I would look above this box I am typing in for a little button that is labeled "Roll." I click on it, and a dialog box opens up.


WARNING: sometimes there is some lag here, because of how slow BGG and RPGG operate.

This little dialog has a number of dice buttons. Click on the one you want. I click "d20," and it will add it to the "Roll" field. You can modify that field manually, so I type in "+3" immediately after the d20. Alternatively, you do not use the dice buttons, but simply type the complete thing.

In theory, I am done. However, I like to add a little bit of text that explains what I am doing. So I wrote "History check-" in the Comment box.


Then I click "Add Roll."

History check- 1d20+3 = (10) + 3 = 13

It worked! (or, actually, adding the roll worked -- whether the check succeeded depends on the GM.)

Keep in mind this is not a text field, so if you misspell something in that optional note area, you cannot go back and edit it without adding an entirely new dice roll.

Here are a few possible rolls:

1d20: you roll a single d20.
1d20+3: you roll a single d20 and add 3 to the result.
1d20-1: you roll a single d20 and subtract 1 from the result.
2d20: you roll two d20s and add up their results.
1d20+1d6: you roll a d20 and a d6 and add up their results.
2d20L: you roll two d20s and drop the result of the lowest one (i.e., you roll with "advantage").
2d20H: you roll two d20s and drop the result of the highest one (i.e., you roll with "disadvantage").

If you roll dice in a post, you get a blue bar at the bottom of the post which you can click on to see all the dice rolled in that post. This is to discourage cheating. Moreover, all the rolls made in a thread are visible from the thread header, again to discourage cheating (by deleting a post). Of course, I do not expect players to be cheaters, but the options for checking are available. This entails that you should not delete dice rolls from a post -- even if you discover that they are unnecessary, just leave them in and write a comment on them.

More information on making die rolls using the GeekRoller you can find here: https://boardgamegeek.com/wiki/page/Geek_Randomizer_Guide#.

The text above I copied for a large part from a post by Jason Panella. Thank him for the extensive explanation.
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  • 1402848. Flyboy Connor
  • 1d20+3 =
  • (10) + 3 =
  • 13
  • History check-
  • Sat Jan 12, 2019 1:36 pm
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9. RPG Item: Buckshots Savaged: Johnny Comes Marching Home [Average Rating:0.00 Unranked]
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Marching Order

When the party is traveling on foot, they use a certain marching order. The marching order is the formation that the party uses to travel. Normally you would like a strong, healthy character with a high "passive perception" in front. Passive perception allows a character to spot enemies, ambushes, and traps. The character needs to be strong and healthy just in case he discovers a trap by walking into it. Naturally, all characters close to the front get to use their passive perception to try to discover danger. However, depending on the trap, it might be that only the characters traveling at the very front spot it (e.g., while all characters may spot an ambush, a pit trap may only be spotted in time by the character who is in the lead).

Once you determine a marching order, I assume that you stick with it until you explicitly change it.
 
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10. RPG Item: Player's Option: Combat & Tactics [Average Rating:6.62 Overall Rank:1954]
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Combat

Combat in D&D is broken up into rounds. A round represents about 6 seconds of real time, and each character in the combat gets to take a turn.

Before the first round of combat, the GM determines Surprise and Initiative. After that, every round of combat every character engaged in the combat gets a turn. During their turn, a character can take a move and an action. All of these aspects of combat are explained below.
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11. RPG Item: A Surprise Find [Average Rating:0.00 Unranked]
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Surprise

In cases where characters and/or NPCs try to attack from a stealthy position, one side in the battle may gain surprise over the other. A character who is surprised does not take their turn during the first round of combat, and neither can they take a reaction (see below).

The GM determines who might be surprised. If neither side tries to be stealthy, they automatically notice each other. Otherwise, the GM compares the Stealth checks of anyone hiding with the Passive Perception score of each creature on the opposing side. Any character or monster that does not notice a threat (i.e., whose Passive Perception is lower than the Stealth check) is surprised at the start of the encounter. It is possible that some members of a group are surprised while others are not.

Note that, in general, an opponent only needs to detect one party member in order to no longer be surprised. So a party which wants to attack with surprise should make sure that the characters who are likely to roll low on Stealth (e.g., those with noisy armor) stay so far away from the enemies that they are not engaged in the first round of combat anyway.
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12. RPG Item: Initiative [Average Rating:0.00 Unranked]
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Initiative

Before combat begins, every character involved rolls initiative. This entails that a d20 is rolled and the character's Initiative modifier is added to it. This is usually the same as the Dexterity modifier.

Each combat round will start with the character who has the highest initiative and then work its way down. During tabletop playing, usually each enemy has their own initiative. However, in PBF play, typically the GM will roll the initiative for groups of monsters. So if I as the GM controlled three goblins, four orcs, and an evil wizard, I'd roll Initiative three times: once for the orcs, once for goblins, and once for the wizard.

A sample Initiative order might look like this:

Bill the rogue-21
Jim the ranger-19
Jack the fighter-18
Glarr the evil wizard-17
Carrie the paladin-16
Orcs-10
Goblins-2

Since Bill has the highest result, he goes first, then Jim, then Jack, then the GM (who controls Glarr), then Carrie, and then finally the GM, who controls both the orcs and goblins.

Your Initiative score stays the same throughout the entire combat. If your score ties with another player, the GM decides who goes first (if players have a preference they can say so). If you tie with a monster, the player character always breaks ties.

Note that in PBF play, to speed things up, turns are often grouped by two, three, or four. This means that the GM allows multiple players to act simultaneously as long as they are on the same team. In the example above, Bill, Jim, and Jack would act together, then Glarr, then Carrie, and finally the Orcs and Goblins together.

I copied a lot of the text above from posts by Jason Panella.
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13. RPG Item: Night Moves [Average Rating:0.00 Unranked]
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Movement

On your turn, you can move a distance up to your speed. You can use as much or as little of your speed as you like.

You can break up your movement on your turn, using some of your speed before and after your action. For example, if you have a speed of 30 feet, you can move 10 feet, take your action, and then move 20 feet.

If you have more than one speed, such as your walking speed and a flying speed, you can switch back and forth between your speeds during your move. Whenever you switch, subtract the distance that you have already moved from the new speed. The result determines how much farther you can move. If the result is zero or less, you cannot use the new speed during the current move.

Combat rarely takes place in bare rooms or on featureless plains. Often you have to deal with "difficult terrain," e.g., swampy ground, a rock-strewn cavern, or obstacles. Every foot of movement in difficult terrain costs one extra foot. If you want to move through a space of another creature, that also counts as difficult terrain (you can move through the space of friendly creatures, or creatures which are two sizes or more smaller than you or bigger than you).

If you lie prone, you can stand up using half your movement speed. To move while prone, you must crawl or use magic such as teleportation. Every foot of movement while crawling costs one extra foot. Crawling one foot in difficult terrain, therefore, costs three feet of movement.

A creature can squeeze through a space that is large enough for a creature one size smaller than it. Thus, a large creature can squeeze through a passage that is only 5 feet wide. While squeezing through a space, the space is treated as difficult terrain, and the creature has disadvantage on attack rolls and Dexterity saving throws. Attack rolls against the creature have advantage while it is in the smaller space.
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14. RPG Item: Cartoon Action Hour [Average Rating:6.40 Overall Rank:6099]
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Actions

Many actions are possible in combat. The basic list consists of:

Attack: Try to damage a creature by taking a swing at a it (if it is next to you), shooting an arrow at it (if it is in range), and so on. You'll probably be doing a lot of this in the game.

Cast a spell: If you are a spellcaster, you can cast a spell, as long as you have one prepared and you have a free spell slot for it. Cantrips do not need a spell slot.

Dash: Dashing gives you extra movement for your turn equal to your base movement speed. So, if your movement is 30 ft., by Dashing on your turn, you can move 60 ft. (but you would not be able to attack).

Disengage: Disengage means moving away from a creature that is next to you without causing an opportunity attack. An opportunity attack is a free swing with a melee weapon at the moving character. More on this below.

Dodge: If you Dodge for your action, any attack against you until your next turn (so, a full round later) is made with Disadvantage.

Help: Distract an enemy so that a friend has an easier time hitting it. You and your friend both have to be next to the creature for this to work. If the friend makes an attack against the creature before your next turn, he makes the attack with Advantage.

Hide: You try to conceal yourself using a Stealth check, which may give you certain advantages in combat later. This is mainly meant for characters who rely on stealth, such as rogues.

Ready: Delaying your action until a certain trigger occurs. For instance, you could say "I will ready my bow and shoot at the first creature that enters my sight." You may give fairly complex commands this way. When the trigger occurs, you will either use your reaction to execute the readied action, or decide not to use the delayed action and retain your reaction. Ready can be useful if you end up early in Initiative order and want to wait until another player has taken their turn. I recommend that if you "ready" an action, you also include a statement that says what you will do if combat goes to your next turn and the trigger did not occur yet. For instance: "I will shoot an arrow at the first enemy that attacks our wizard; if no creature attacks the wizard before my next turn, I will shoot an arrow at the closest enemy. If no enemies are in range at that time, I will Search for secret doors." Note that you cannot ready a move! (Exception: if you want to dash, you can ready the second half of your move.) Note also that if you use your reaction for something else (e.g., executing an Attack of Opportunity), you will no longer be able to execute your readied action. For spells, note that if you want to ready a spell, you will cast it during your turn, just delay activating it until the readied action gets executed -- this means that it will cost a spell slot, regardless whether or not the spell goes off.

Search: Use either your Perception or Investigation skill (the GM determines which) to search the environment for something specific.

Shove: You may try to push another creature when you are next to it. This is a contest between your Strength, and either the Athletics or Acrobatics skill of the opponent (whichever is higher). If you succeed, you push the creature five feet away from you.

Use an Object: In rare cases you will need to spend an action to interact with an object during combat. For instance, you may have a special weapon which needs an action to prepare it.

There are more actions that you can take; in principle you can use any action that you would be able to take outside combat. For instance, you might try to use your Intimidation skill to try to force an opponent into submission. The actions above, however, are the most typical ones used in combat.

Extra actions

Besides the move and action, you can also, for free, do the following:

Free action: You may interact with one object or feature of the environment, e.g., open a door, or draw a sword. You may not use your free action to interact with two or more objects or features. Note that if you want to switch weapons, dropping a weapon is completely free which allows you to use your free action to draw your new weapon, but putting your first weapon away and then drawing your second weapon requires two actions, thus your free action and your regular action. In general, the GM might rule that something costs a real action instead of it being a free action.

Communicate: You may communicate through brief utterances (which does not preclude you from discussing things OOC).

Bonus action: You may perform one bonus action, but only if you have one -- if an ability or object can be used as a bonus action, this is always explained in their description.

Reactions

A reaction is an action that you take outside your turn. Certain spells and abilities allow you to take reactions. An opportunity attack is also a reaction, as is the execution of a readied action. You can take only one reaction until your next turn. This means that if you have a readied action, and you then, for instance, can take an opportunity attack, you have to choose whether to take the opportunity attack and lose the readied action, or ignore the opportunity attack.

I copied some of the text above from posts by Jason Panella.
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15. RPG Item: Attack of the 50 Foot Fiasco! [Average Rating:7.00 Unranked]
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Attacking

How do you make an attack?

First you pick a target.

If you are using a sword, mace, warhammer, or something similar, the target has to be close to you.

Ranged weapons have a normal and maximum range which has to be taken into account. You cannot attack anything beyond the maximum range, and you attack with disadvantage if the target is beyond the normal range. You also have disadvantage if you try to use a ranged attack against a target which stands next to you.

Ranged spells have a maximum range. You cannot choose a target beyond that maximum range.

Second, you determine the attack modifier.

Every weapon has an attack modifier. You will find this listed on the character sheet. If you need to determine your attack modifier for a weapon, it is usually either the Strength modifier or the Dexterity modifier, with your proficiency bonus added (if you are proficient in the weapon).

Example: Slim is a paladin and has a warhammer as a weapon. Warhammers use Strength as attack modifier. His strength is 16, so the modifier is +3. His proficiency bonus is +2. So 2 plus 3 = 5. His modifier is +5.

Basically, you only determine attack modifier once; that is why you find it on your character sheet. However, certain things (like spells, for instance) may influence your attack modifier.

Third, you determine whether you hit.

You roll a d20 and add the attack modifier. The GM compares the result to the target's Armor Class (AC). If it is the same or higher, you manage to hit successfully! If you miss, this is where the attack ends, and you do no damage.

Just like with skills, there are circumstances in which you attack with advantage or disadvantage. In that case you roll two dice and use the higher if you are rolling with advantage, and the lower if you are rolling with disadvantage.

If you roll 20 on your attack die (before modifiers are added), you score a critical hit! A critical hit hits automatically, regardless what other things influence the attack.

If you roll 1 on your attack die (before modifiers are added), you score a critical miss. A critical miss misses automatically, regardless what other things influence the attack.

A creature may be in cover. A target with half cover has a +2 bonus to AC and Dexterity saving throws. Half cover might be something like a low wall, a large piece of furniture, or another creature. A target with three-quarters cover has +5 bonus to AC and Dexterity saving throws. A target with total cover cannot be targeted directly by an attack or a spell (though it may still suffer from area-of-attack spells).

If you try to attack a creature which you cannot see, but you know where it should be, you attack with disadvantage. If you try to use a ranged attack against a creature within five feet of you, you also attack with disadvantage.

You may have a weapon in each hand. You can use your regular attack with the weapon in your main hand, and you may use your bonus action to attack with the weapon in your off-hand. Both weapons must be light weapons for this to work. You roll attack separately for each weapon. Note that you will not add any modifiers (unless they are negative) to the damage that you do with the weapon in your off-hand.

Fourth, if you hit, your determine damage.

You roll the damage die (or dice) and see how much damage you do. Damage is usually the result of the dice with some extra modifier. For weapons, the modifier is usually the same as the attack modifier. For spells, the modifier is given in the spell description.

If the damage is the result of a critical hit, you roll the dice twice, but only add any modifiers once.

Damage is usually of a certain type, e.g., "bludgeoning damage" or "fire damage." Creatures may be vulnerable, resistant, or immune to certain damage types. If a creature is vulnerable, then damage will be doubled. If a creature is resistant, damage will be halved. If a creature is immune, damage will be negated.

Damage is subtracted from a creature's current hitpoints. If a creature reaches zero hitpoints, it dies. If you are using a melee weapon to hit a creature and the creature reaches zero hitpoints, you may choose to knock it out instead of killing it. You might want to interrogate it later! Not all creatures can be knocked out, though; it is up to the GM to decide whether it is possible.

Note that sometimes when a creature damages a player, there may be extra effects of the attack, e.g., the player is poisoned. This is called a "status effect" or "condition." Usually it means that the player has some disadvantages, which often can be negated by a certain action or a die roll.

Some of the text above was copied from a post by Jason Panella.
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16. RPG Item: Pathfinder Cards: Condition Cards [Average Rating:7.96 Overall Rank:301]
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Conditions

A condition lasts either until it is countered (this depends on the condition; usually the GM will tell you what you need to do to counter it) or dissipates. You may have multiple conditions simultaneously. The following conditions exist (note that some refer to each other):

Blinded
A blinded creature cannot see and automatically fails any ability check that requires sight. Attack rolls against the creature have advantage, and the creature's Attack rolls have disadvantage.

Charmed
A charmed creature cannot Attack the charmer or target the charmer with harmful Abilities or magical effects. The charmer has advantage on any ability check to interact socially with the creature. Basically, a charmed creature considers the charmer "a good friend," but that does not change its further relations or its intentions. I.e., you can ask a charmed creature not to attack you or your friends, and it may comply, but if your friends continue to attack the creature's friends, it may consider your friends viable targets.

Deafened
A deafened creature cannot hear and automatically fails any ability check that requires hearing.

Fatigued
A fatigued creature suffers from Exhaustion. Exhaustion is measured in six levels, and every time the creature gains an exhaustion level, the current level is increased by 1 (or more, depending on what happens). Each level encompasses all the effects of all the lower levels. A long rest lowers exhaustion by 1. The level effects are as follows: At level 1, the creature has disadvantage on Ability Checks. At level 2, its speed is halved. At level 3, the creature has disadvantage on Attack rolls and Saving Throws. At level 4, its hitpoint maximum is halved. At level 5, its speed is reduced to zero. At level 6, it is dead.

Frightened
A frightened creature has disadvantage on Ability Checks and Attack rolls while the source of its fear is within line of sight. The creature cannot willingly move closer to the source of its fear.

Grappled
A grappled creature's speed becomes zero, and it cannot benefit from any bonus to its speed. The condition ends if the Grappler is incapacitated. The condition also ends if an effect removes the grappled creature from the reach of the Grappler or Grappling effect, such as when a creature is hurled away by the Thunderwave spell.

Incapacitated
An incapacitated creature cannot take actions or reactions.

Invisible
An invisible creature is impossible to see without the aid of magic or a Special sense. For the purpose of Hiding, the creature is heavily obscured. The creature's location can be detected by any noise it makes or any tracks it leaves. Attack rolls against the creature have disadvantage, and the creature's Attack rolls have advantage.

Paralyzed
A paralyzed creature is incapacitated and cannot move or speak. The creature automatically fails Strength and Dexterity Saving Throws. Attack rolls against the creature have advantage. Any Attack that hits the creature is a critical hit if the attacker is within 5 feet of the creature.

Petrified
A petrified creature is transformed, along with any non-magical object it is wearing or carrying, into a solid inanimate substance (usually stone). Its weight increases by a factor of ten, and it ceases aging. The creature is incapacitated, cannot move or speak, and is unaware of its surroundings. Attack rolls against the creature have advantage. The creature automatically fails Strength and Dexterity Saving Throws. The creature has Resistance to all damage. The creature is immune to poison and disease, although a poison or disease already in its system is suspended, not neutralized.

Poisoned
A poisoned creature has disadvantage on Attack rolls and Ability Checks.

Prone
A prone creature's only Movement option is to crawl, unless it stands up and thereby ends the condition. The creature has disadvantage on Attack rolls. An Attack roll against the creature has advantage if the attacker is within 5 feet of the creature. Otherwise, the Attack roll has disadvantage.

Restrained
A restrained creature's speed becomes zero, and it cannot benefit from any bonus to its speed. Attack rolls against the creature have advantage, and the creature's Attack rolls have disadvantage. The creature has disadvantage on Dexterity Saving Throws.

Stunned
A stunned creature is incapacitated, cannot move, and can speak only falteringly. The creature automatically fails Strength and Dexterity Saving Throws. Attack rolls against the creature have advantage.

Unconscious
An unconscious creature is incapacitated, cannot move or speak, and is unaware of its surroundings. The creature drops whatever it is holding and falls prone. The creature automatically fails Strength and Dexterity Saving Throws. Attack rolls against the creature have advantage. Any Attack that hits the creature is a critical hit if the attacker is within 5 feet of the creature.
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17. RPG Item: DCC #020.5: The Mask of Death [Average Rating:8.50 Unranked]
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Death

If a player character suffers more damage than hitpoints remaining, and the excess damage (i.e., the damage that is done which remains after reducing the character to zero hitpoints) equals or exceeds the maximum hitpoints of the character, the character is dead. In some case, damage done to a character causes instant death, regardless of the damage done (the GM may decide this). Otherwise, the character remains at zero hitpoints and is unconscious and dying.

A dying character can be healed to wake up again and continue fighting. If healing is not available, party members may use their Medicine skill to try to stabilize a dying character, or use a healer's kit (which succeeds automatically). If a character is stabilized, he is no longer dying but still unconscious and at zero hitpoints.

Every turn, a dying character has to make a death saving throw -- this means that he rolls a d20 and has a success on rolling 10 or higher, and a failure otherwise. After three successes the character is stabilized; after three failures the character is dead. Rolling a 1 counts as two failures. Rolling a 20 counts as a complete success and the character wakes up with 1 hitpoint.

If a dying character suffers damage, it counts as one failed death saving throw, or two failed death saving throws if the damage is a critical hit. If a dying character suffers a single blow which does damage equal to or exceeding maximum hitpoints, the character dies immediately.

If a character is dead, it need not be the end. There is magic which restores life to a dead character. However, such magic is expensive and requires particular components. If the party does not have the means to cast such magic, they may take the remains of the dead character to a town to try to get him resurrected. They should count on paying through the nose for this, though.

The most common ways of restoring life to a dead character are the following:
- If a character dies but his body is still intact, you can cast Revivify (3rd level cleric spell) from a scroll or from memory to restore him to life, if you do so within 1 minute after the moment of death.
- Raise Dead (5th level cleric spell) is the same, but can be cast up to 10 days after dying. A diamond worth 500 gp is consumed by the process.
- Should vital organs or body parts be missing, Resurrection (7th level cleric spell) is needed to gain life again. This spell can be cast up to one century after death. A diamond worth 1,000 gp is consumed by the process.
- If all else fails, True Resurrection (9th level cleric spell) can still recreate the dead character, if cast within 200 years after death. Diamonds with a value of at least 25,000 gp are consumed by the process.

If you cannot cast these spells yourself, you can find a temple where you can pay to have them cast (if a cleric of sufficient level is available at the temple). Naturally, True Resurrection is beyond the means of a low-level party, and Resurrection may also be too expensive, but Raise Dead can be bought for 1250 gp, and a Revivify scroll costs no more than 200-250 gp (though it should be noted that it has a chance of failing if the cleric or paladin casting it does not have it yet available in their spell collection).

If a character has the Acolyte background, they may ask for one spell of the standard spell list at a temple for free if the components are provided. For Raise Dead, that is a diamond worth 500 gp, which you can generally buy at the temple. Moreover, faction members can get Raise Dead for free from their faction as long as they have not yet reached fifth level (however, the character will not gain any XP for the session or other rewards, which have to be handed over to the faction).
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18. RPG Item: Grid de Combate [Average Rating:8.00 Unranked]
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Combat Grid

There are two ways to visualize combat.

The first is to use the "theater of the mind", in which the GM simply describes the situation and the players describe their actions.

The second is to display combat on a grid, which shows all the creatures in the battle.

I may use both methods in a game. For simple situations, I may use the theater of the mind. For more complex situation, I may use the combat grid. For really complex situations I may use a combination of both, such as having a very general map which indicates where everyone is located, but without a grid.

The combat grid is divided into cells. Each cell is supposed to be five feet across, unless otherwise indicated. Each cell can only contain one creature, though some creatures take up multiple cells (if they are really big). You are allowed to move through a cell which contains a friendly creature, but not through one that contains an enemy (there are certain exceptions to that depending on size, but don't let that bother you for now). Naturally, you cannot move through obstacles.

You measure distances simply by counting cells. So moving five cells horizontally is 25 feet, and moving five cells diagonally is also counted as 25 feet. That's just to make things easy.

Adjacency is counted horizontally, vertically, and diagonally. That means that every cell (except those at the borders of the grid) has eight adjacent cells.

Some maps will be partially blacked out, namely for the areas which you cannot see. Once these areas are in range, they are shown. This is called the "fog of war."
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19. RPG Item: GR3: Treasure Maps [Average Rating:5.63 Overall Rank:7629]
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Rewards

During the adventure, the characters often gain rewards. Rewards are often the following types:

Experience

Experience (XP) is a value that adds up during the adventure. At certain points, the characters gain a "level." The amount of XP needed to gain a level increases with the levels. You can gain XP by defeating monsters, by finishing quests, or by dealing with certain situations. In general, you do not have to kill a monster to gain XP from it, just incapacitating it or successfully avoiding it may gain you XP. The Monster Manual indicates how much XP killing a particular monster is worth, but, as always, in the end it is up to the GM to decide how XP is awarded.

The adventure may also work with "milestones," i.e., the characters gain a level by achieving a particular goal. In that case, XP is not needed and not even counted. The GM may also decide to use a mix, i.e., counting XP and allowing characters to gain access to a new part of the adventure when they reach a certain level.

Gold

With the term "gold," a general reference is made to "money." The D&D 5E rulebooks describe that there are five types of currency: copper, silver, electrum, gold, and platinum. Expressed in gold:

1 copper = 1/100 gold
1 silver = 1/10 gold
1 electrum = 1/2 gold
1 gold = 1 gold
1 platinum = 10 gold

Because electrum and platinum are pretty unwieldy, most GMs only use copper, silver, and gold. It is best to list your current cash as "gp," which stands for "gold pieces," with two decimals (alternatively, list gold, silver, and copper, but not platinum and electrum, whereby silver and copper are between 0 and 9 pieces). You may then assume that you have a variety of coins which you carry.

Gems

Gems have a certain value which is expressed in gp. This value is the sales price; you can sell them for that value at most traders. You can also carry them with you, as they are an easy way to carry large amounts of money without being overburdened with coins (not that we will really use encumbrance rules for gems or coins in this adventure). Also, sometimes someone might want to be paid in gems rather than in gold.

Since there are many different kinds of gems, the GM will tell you the value when you gain them. You just record the value with the gem.

Items

You will find various items during your adventures. Like gems, these items have values. You may also buy items. In general, the sales price for an item is half the price that you would have to pay for it.

Like gems, you may decide to carry mundane items with you rather than selling them at a trader. However, this has two disadvantages: (1) some items may be heavy or unwieldy, and in that case encumbrance rules will apply (you might not even be able to carry an item without a cart or something), and (2) items cannot be used as general currency, so you cannot use items instead of coins when you need to pay for something.

As for armor and weapons of slain enemies: you should assume that these are worthless unless they are magic. While you may drag the armor of any guard that you slay with you, when you get to a trading post, you may find that the trader will consider the items too dirty and damaged to be of any value.

I wish to make a special note about ammunition. Common ammunition for a weapon we will not track. When you gain a weapon, you get some ammunition for it, and you may assume this does not run out (you either collect it again after a fight or buy some when you have a chance; it tends to be cheap). Magic ammunition, however, will be tracked, and cannot be reclaimed after using it.

Magic Items

Sometimes the party will discover a magic item. This item can either be sold (the GM will tell you what you get for it) or be used by a party member.

Some magic items need "attunement," i.e., you will need to spend some time studying it before you can use it (again, the GM will tell you what you need to do). You can only be attuned to three items simultaneously! So there is no putting a magic ring on each finger.

When you discover a magic item, you usually do not know what it does -- you may detect that it is magic, but the type of magic is unknown. You can use an Identify spell to find out more about it. If you cannot cast Identify yourself, you can let a priest at a temple cast it for 10 gp.

If multiple party members want a magic item, they may decide who gets it. If they cannot decide, the GM will decide for them.

Renown

Sometimes you may gain one or more points of "renown" for a certain faction. You only get this renown if you are a member of that particular faction. Gaining higher levels of renown in a faction will provide you access to increasing benefits within the faction.

Story Awards

Occasionally you gain access to a particular feature because you did something specific in an adventure. That counts as a "story award." You record it on your character sheet, and may use it when it applies.

Downtime Days

Some adventures (in particular in Adventurers League modules) grant you "downtime days." These are days that you can spend on learning new skills and spells. They are not used in longer adventures, as these may last for several years of adventurers' lives. The adventurers simply have to spend the time within the adventure to accomplish what they want to do.
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20. RPG Item: Shopping Spree [Average Rating:0.00 Unranked]
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Spending Gold

In D&D 5th Edition there is no shopping for special items. The regular stores have mundane items for sale (lists are found in the PHB), but there is not really any trade in magic items. So you might wonder what you need your gold for. The most common ways to spend your gold are:

Buying mundane items: You will need rations, you will need the occasional healing kit, you may want to buy some extra tools, you may want to buy a better weapon at some point. Especially early in the adventures, you will still be eyeing mundane upgrades to your equipment. Mundane items can be bought at most trading posts.

Buying materials for writing spells in a spell book: Magic users with a spell book can write new spells in it. They will need an example for that. It is easy to find written spells up to third level in bigger towns and cities, where there usually is a wizard willing to give you a peek at their spell book. The cost of writing a spell is 50 gp and 2 hours of work per spell level. (Note that you cannot write new cantrips; cantrips are not spells that you learn, but that you know.)

Buying spell scrolls and healing potions: Spell scrolls up to third level are available for sale in the bigger towns and cities, for one-time casting of a spell. Prices are 60 gp for a 1st level spell, 120 gp for a 2nd level spell, and 200 gp for a 3rd level spell. Healing potions (50 gp) are a very common item to buy.

Buying ingredients: For some spells you will need to buy ingredients. While the cost of common ingredients won't be tracked, some spells consume expensive items. For instance, casting Find Familiar consumes 10 gp worth of materials, and casting Raise Dead consumes a diamond worth 500 gp. Moreover, some spells need an expensive item to cast them, even if the item is not consumed; you will have to acquire such an item once.

Cost of living: To maintain a modest style of living, e.g., while on the road, you will have to spend at least 1 gp per day. This is the cost to get food and drink, and maintain your equipment. Living a comfortable life style, e.g., sleeping in nicer beds in an inn, costs 2 gp per day. The prices of inns in towns and cities differ; they may be far more expensive. If you want to go hobnobbing with aristocracy, you will have to maintain a rich lifestyle, costing at least 10 gp per day.

Travel: When traveling long distance, you may wish to hire a coach, a horse, a boat, or another mode of transport. Depending on the safety of the route, prices can vary enormously. You have to count on paying at least 3 cp per mile traveled on safe roads, but prices can skyrocket in unsafe conditions.

Buying casting of spells at a temple: Temples have cleric spell casting services for sale. For common spells, such as Remove Curse (40 gp) and Lesser Restoration (20 gp), prices are relatively low. The most expensive spell that can commonly be cast, is Raise Dead (1250 gp). A party without a cleric might wish to use these services. A party with a cleric might also wish to use these services should the cleric die.

So there are plenty of ways to spend your gold. If you want to still spend gold on acquiring magic items, you will have to ask the GM what he or she allows. In my games, I allow players to buy all Common and most of the Uncommon items, if they are in a really big city (e.g., Waterdeep), for the prices most commonly used for such purposes, listed on the Sane Magic Items Price List (http://www.giantitp.com/forums/showthread.php?424243-Sane-Ma...). Restrictions are at my discretion. Rare, Very Rare, and Legendary items are never for sale. If you want to sell items, I use the same price list (items being sold for 50% of the listed value), noting however that you will not be able to sell most Rare, Very Rare, or Legendary items at stores (if only because they do not have that much gold available).
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21. RPG Item: Greatly Abbreviated Mechanics, etc. [Average Rating:0.00 Unranked]
Pieter
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Abbreviations

5E = 5th Edition
AC = Armor Class
CHA = CHArisma
CON = CONstitution
DEX = DEXterity
DM = Dungeon Master (same as GM)
DMG = Dungeon Master's Guide
D&D = Dungeons & Dragons
GM = Game Master (same as DM)
HP = Hit Points
IC = In Character
INT = INTelligence
IRL = In Real Life
MM = Monster Manual
NPC = Non-Player Character
OOC = Out Of Character
PC = Player Character
PHB = Player's HandBook
PP = Passive Perception
RPG = Role Playing Game
RPGG = Role Playing Game Geek
STR = STRength
WIS = WISdom
XP = eXPerience
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22. RPG Item: Lead By Example [Average Rating:7.00 Overall Rank:4048]
Pieter
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Name: Velomille ("Velo")
Race: Human (Chondathan)
Sex: Male
Age: Early twenties
Alignment: Chaotic Neutral
Class: Wizard (Abjuration)
Level: 3
XP: 2250/2700


IC Text Color
IC Thought Color

Downtime Days: 70
Faction: Zentharim
Renown: 1


Description/Background:


Velo was raised deep in Neverwinter Wood, by an elderly human wizard called Markhall, whom he refers to as "Grandpa". He does not know who his parents are or if they are still alive; Grandpa told him that, during one of his treks through the woods, he found him as a 6-month old baby, in the underbrush at the side of a seldom-used path. Evidently he had been lying there for a day or two already, as he was quite malnourished. Grandpa suspected that there was something special about him, as he could not understand why wild animals had left him alone. He took him home to his small hut in the woods, where he took care of him. Grandpa told Velo later that he had considered bringing him to an orphanage, but decided against it because he wanted to find out more about the boy. However, if he ever discovered more about Velo, he never discussed it with him.

Grandpa taught Velo to read and write, and already at a young age introduced him to magic. Velo had some aptitude for it, and eagerly thumbed through the few magic volumes that Grandpa had lying around. Grandpa sometimes left for a day or two, leaving Velo with enough food and water to last him several days. He never discussed these trips with Velo, but it was clear to the boy that he must have stayed at a town, as he usually returned with materials that cannot easily be found in nature.

As a teenager, Grandpa took Velo a couple of times on a trip to town. On these trips, Velo got to interact with other people, and learned more about society. Grandpa traded reagents that he found in the woods for some gold, which allowed them to stay at an inn for a few days, and to buy provisions, before returning to their hut in the woods. However, Grandpa also undertook trips alone occasionally, telling Velo that he could not accompany him, without explaining why.

While Velo grew up to be a healthy young adult, Grandpa grew older, and began to suffer from many ailments. One day, Grandpa felt very weak and was unable to leave his bed. He told Velo that he wanted to brew a potion to ease his pains. He gave Velo some money, and asked him to go to the closest town and acquire the necessary components. Velo did as he was asked, went to the town, got what he needed, and returned. However, upon his return, he found the hut empty. Grandpa was gone. A few of his possessions had also disappeared. There was no note, nor were there signs of struggle. It was as if Grandpa had just got up, packed a few things, and left. Velo explored the surroundings, but did not find any clues to what had happened.

He waited for a few days, but Grandpa did not return. In the meantime, he deliberated what he should do. Finally, he decided that without Grandpa, there was no reason for him to stay at the hut. If he was going to continue his studies in magic, he needed to find new books, new teachers, and more experience. He left a note in case Grandpa would return some day, gathered his few possessions, and left, still wondering if he would ever find out what happened to Grandpa.

Background: Outlander.
Variant: Exchanged one language for proficiency with Thieves' Tools.

Personal Goals:
To learn about the world and magic.
To find out what happened to Grandpa.

Personality Traits:
Not having had many in my life, I like sweets.
I always have an eye out for useful plants and materials found in nature.

Ideals:
Free Thinking. Inquiry and curiosity are the pillars of progress. (Chaotic)

Bonds:
Regardless what I will find out about Grandpa, I will always consider him an example to follow.

Flaws:
Due to my lack of experience with interacting with people, I tend to be book-smart but not people-smart.

Statistics:

Hit Points: 17/17
Ward: 0/9
Hit Dice: 3d6
Armor Class: 12/15 with Mage Armor
Speed: 30 ft
Initiative: +2
Passive Perception: 14
Proficiency Bonus: +2


Abilities:
STR 8 (-1)
DEX 14 (+2)
CON 12 (+1)
INT 16 (+3)
WIS 14 (+2)
CHA 10 (+0)


Saving Throws:
STR: -1
DEX: +2
CON: +3
INT: +5
WIS: +4
CHR: +0


Skills:
+2 Acrobatics (Dex)
+2 Animal Handling (Wis)
+5 Arcana (Int)
+1 Athletics (Str)
+2 Deception (Cha)
+3 History (Int)
+2 Insight (Wis)
+0 Intimidation (Cha)
+5 Investigation (Int)
+2 Medicine (Wis)
+3 Nature (Int)
+4 Perception (Wis)
+0 Performance (Cha)
+0 Persuasion (Cha)
+3 Religion (Int)
+2 Sleight of Hand (Dex)
+2 Stealth (Dex)
+4 Survival (Wis)


Attack Workspace:

Dagger: melee, 1d4+2 piercing, finesse, +4 to hit (thrown 20/60 ft)
Sling: ranged 30/120 ft, 1d4+2 bludgeoning, +4 to hit (40 bullets)


Racial Traits:

Variant Human:
Intelligence +1
Wisdom +1
Perception proficiency


Feat Resilient (Constitution): Choose one ability score. You gain the following benefits:
- Increase the chosen ability score by 1, to a maximum of 20.
- You gain proficiency in saving throws using the chosen ability.

Class Features:

Arcane Recovery: When you finish a short rest, regain spell slots totaling no more than half the wizard level (rounded up), and each must be 5th level or lower (use once/day).

Abjuration Savant (School of Abjuration): At 2nd level, the gold and time you must spend to copy an abjuration spell into your spellbook is halved.

Arcane Ward (School of Abjuration): Starting at 2nd level, when you cast an abjuration spell of 1st level or higher, you can simultaneously use a strand of the spell's magic to create a magical ward on yourself that lasts until you finish a long rest. The ward has hit points equal to twice your wizard level + your Intelligence modifier. Whenever you take damage, the ward takes the damage instead. If this damage reduces the ward to 0 hit points, you take any remaining damage. While the ward has 0 hit points, it cannot absorb damage, but its magic remains. Whenever you cast an abjuration spell of 1st level or higher, the ward regains a number of hit points equal to twice the level of the spell. Once you create the ward, you cannot create it again until you finish a long rest.

Wanderer (Outlander feature): You have an excellent memory for maps and geography, and you can always recall the general layout of terrain, settlements, and other features around you. In addition, you can find food and fresh water for yourself and up to five other people each day, provided that the land offers berries, small game, water, and so forth.

Familiar: Slick

Tiny fey owl

AC 11
HP 1
STR 3 (-4)
DEX 13 (+1)
CON 8 (-1)
INT 2 (-4)
WIS 12 (+1)
CHA 7 (-2)


Skills: Perception +3, Stealth +3
Senses: Darkvision 120 ft., passive Perception 13
Flyby: Slick does not provoke attacks of opportunity when she flies out of an enemy's reach.
Keen Hearing and Sight: Slick has advantage on Wisdom (Perception) checks that rely on hearing or sight.
Note: Slick is of the type Micrathene whitneyi (elf owl), measuring 5 inches in height, easily fitting in an inner pocket of Velo's cloak.

Weapon Proficiencies: Daggers, darts, slings, quarterstaffs, light crossbows.

Armor Proficiencies: None.

Tool Proficiencies: Thieves' Tools (variant on the Outlander background), Flute.

Other Proficiencies: Arcana, Athletics (Outlander), Deception (Zhentarim), Investigation, Perception (variant human), Survival (Outlander).

Languages: Common, Elvish.

Expertise (if any): N/A.

Equipment:

658.25 gp

Backpack
Bedroll
Black bear's tooth
Book of lore
Bottle of ink
Chalk (3 pieces)
Component pouch
Dagger
Diamond (50gp, for Chromatic Orb)
Dice set
Fishing tackle
Flask
Flute
Healer's kit (10/10)
Ink pen
Little bag of sand
Mess kit
Parchment (10 sheets)
Pearl (100gp, for Identify)
Rations (10 days)
Rope (hempen, 50 ft)
Sling (with 40 bullets)
Small knife
Soap
Spellbook
Thieves' tools
Tinderbox
Torches (10)
Traveler's clothes
Waterskin


Spell Workspace:

Spell Save DC: 13
Spell Attack Modifier: +5
Spell Preparation Limit: 6


Spellbook
* denotes prepared
A denotes Abjuration
R denotes Ritual
C denotes Concentration
gp denotes cost
xdy denotes damage

Cantrips:
* Fire Bolt (1d10)
* Mage Hand
* Prestidigitation


1st Level (4 prepared):
Charm Person
Chromatic Orb
Comprehend Languages (R)
Detect Magic (R,C)
* Feather Fall
Find Familiar (R,10gp)
Identify (R)
* Mage Armor (A)
* Magic Missile (3 darts, 1d4+1)
* Shield (A)
Sleep


2nd Level (2 prepared):
Alter Self (C)
* Shatter (3d8)
* Suggestion (C)


Spell Slots:

1st level (4) [ ][ ][ ][ ]
2nd level (2) [ ][ ]

Note: I bought three extra first-level spells and one extra second-level spell (PHB p.114).

Adventurers League scenario's:

Defiance in Phlan (IC, OOC): adventure 1 and 2
In Volo's Wake (GM, IC, OOC): mini adventures 1 to 6
In Volo's Wake (GM, IRL): mini adventures 3 to 6
The Vault of the Devourer (IC, OOC)
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