The Hotness
Games|People|Company
Legacy of Dragonholt
The Elf Archaeologists Are Saying Hurtful Things About Your Skeleton
Call of Cthulhu Starter Set
Steve Jackson's Sorcery! Bundled Set
StoryCube: The Roleplaying Game
Big Trouble
Waterdeep: Dragon Heist
Player's Handbook (D&D 5e)
Hoard of the Dragon Queen
Tech Support
Escape the Underdark
Dark Elves' Lair
The Great Pendragon Campaign
The Space Gamer (Issue 15 - Jan 1978)
Drunken Bear Fighter
Tales from the Loop: GM Screen
Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay (4th Edition)
Realms of Terrinoth
Into the Jungle
RuneQuest: Roleplaying in Glorantha
Forbidden Knowledge
Mutants & Marvels 1.0
Book 01: The Warlock of Firetop Mountain
Book 04: Starship Traveller
Book 05: City of Thieves
Book 01: Dungeon of Dread
Masque of the Red Death and Other Tales
Griffin Mountain
The SKETCH System Core Rulebook
Dragon (Issue 72 - Apr 1983)
Heart of Ice
Pathfinder Roleplaying Game: Beginner Box
Dark Heresy Second Edition Core Rulebook
Fragged Empire: Core Rule Book
Dungeons & Dragons Starter Set
Monster Manual (D&D 5e)
Dungeon Master's Guide (D&D 5e)
Blades in the Dark
Volo's Guide to Monsters
Orbital 2100
Tales from the Loop
Tales from the Loop: Map
Tomb of Annihilation
Ironsworn
Shattered: A Grimdark RPG
Mothership Player's Survival Guide
Pathfinder #136: Temple of the Peacock Spirit
Pathfinder #137: The City Outside of Time
Rangers of Shadow Deep: A Tabletop Adventure Game
Android: Shadow of the Beanstalk
GeekGold Bonus for All Supporters at year's end: 1000!
9,193 Supporters
$15 min for supporter badge & GeekGold bonus
18 Days Left

Support:

Recommend
125 
 Thumb up
 Hide
2663 Posts
[1]  Prev «  103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107  Next »  [107] | 

RPG» Forums » Community » The Tavern

Subject: What is the last novel you read? And what are you going to read next? rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: books [+] [View All]
Kevin
msg tools
badge
Avatar
aramis wrote:
Reading non-fiction only...
currently reading Grunt: the Curious Science of Humans at War (Mary Roach, 2016). interesting stuff.


FYI, there is a corresponding thread for nonfiction:

What is the last non-fiction book you read? And what are you going to read next?
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
¡dn ʇǝƃ ʇ,uɐɔ ı puɐ uǝllɐɟ ǝʌ,ı
Canada
Chestermere
Alberta
flag msg tools
Life lesson: Hamsters are NOT diswasher safe.
badge
There are 10 types of people-- those who understand binary, and those who don't.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
gonecase wrote:
Dan Brown's Origin. Robert Langdon races around Spain trying to save an overblown TEDX talk. Lots of "did you know" dialogue, the usual assassin driven by religion and little tidbits about science, religion and Gaudi. Meh.

Meh, indeed.
The least "fun" of any of his books so far. I think he's run out of steam.

The anti-religion/ humanist stuff in this one was interesting, at least, assuming you weren't offend by the whole concept to start with. But that dose of sacrilegious scandal was played out in earlier novels (especially in Angels and Demons and DaVinci Code) so I don't suppose anyone read those and then expected his views to change 180 degrees on this one.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Adam
United States
Tempe
Arizona
flag msg tools
AaAaAaAaAaAaA! Oh no! You shanked my Jenga ship!
badge
"We are plain quiet folk and have no use for adventures. Nasty disturbing uncomfortable things! Make you late for dinner! I can't think what anybody sees in them."
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I just concluded Kim Stanley Robinson's The Years of Rice and Salt. This is an alternate history in which the Black Plague wipes out Europe and China and the Islamic world rise to become the dominant world and would-be colonial powers. It's also an examination of Buddhism, and to a lesser extent Islam, as well as a love letter to the sciences. Beyond the alternate history, the novel follows the same group of characters as they continue to reincarnate through the years the novel covers. This is one I'll be revisiting for sure.

Having done a little post-novel researching, it seems that I'm a rarity, having read this before his Mars trilogy. I'll have to look at that, soon.
6 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
TTDG
United States
Fairfax
Virginia
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I've read Dragon Precinct, and Unicorn Precinct. I liked them for mixing a medium magic D&D, medieval world, with police investigations. Our heroes in the guard do have access to a magical 'see what happened' spell, but of course in the harder cases that does not tell them much because someone was disguised or invisible, etc, so it comes back to basic police work. I had not see that mix much before.
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Caroline Berg
United States
Washington
flag msg tools
designer
badge
...124 to run fleeing from the mountain. ...125 to use a rope to climb the cliff. ...126 to quickly cast "summon stairs." ...127 to dodge under the falling rocks.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
ThroughTheDeckGlass wrote:
I've read Dragon Precinct, and Unicorn Precinct. I liked them for mixing a medium magic D&D, medieval world, with police investigations. Our heroes in the guard do have access to a magical 'see what happened' spell, but of course in the harder cases that does not tell them much because someone was disguised or invisible, etc, so it comes back to basic police work. I had not see that mix much before.

Oh, nice. It reminds me of the Beka Cooper Trilogy trilogy by Tamora Pierce (just from your description). Another Medieval magic & police investigation series is the Hawk & Fisher series by Simon R. Green. And if you like these kinds of short stories, there is Murder by Magic: Twenty Tales of Crime and the Supernatural edited by Rosemary Edghill .
4 
 Thumb up
1.00
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Adam
United States
Tempe
Arizona
flag msg tools
AaAaAaAaAaAaA! Oh no! You shanked my Jenga ship!
badge
"We are plain quiet folk and have no use for adventures. Nasty disturbing uncomfortable things! Make you late for dinner! I can't think what anybody sees in them."
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I just finished Neal Stephenson's The Diamond Age which explores the possibilities and dangers of nanotechnology. I really liked this book, but ultimately felt a bit frustrated by it as Stephenson takes big jumps in time, and ultimately leaves out a lot of important / interesting details as a result. It left me feeling like the book either should have been a series, or at least twice as long as it actually was. So, Snow Crash is still my current favorite from him, and I'll probably check out more of his work in the future, hoping for better.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Caroline Berg
United States
Washington
flag msg tools
designer
badge
...124 to run fleeing from the mountain. ...125 to use a rope to climb the cliff. ...126 to quickly cast "summon stairs." ...127 to dodge under the falling rocks.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I'm currently reading The Freeze-Frame Revolution by Peter Watts. Yes, is it technically part of a series (most of the series plays out as short stories), and yes, I'm reading it out of order, but my husband picked it up from the library, and it includes a secret message in the text you have to discover!! So I had to read it to discover the message for myself. I'm over halfway done (I started yesterday) and the goal is to finish it tonight. It's surprisingly good and now I'm going to have to read more by him.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Caroline Berg
United States
Washington
flag msg tools
designer
badge
...124 to run fleeing from the mountain. ...125 to use a rope to climb the cliff. ...126 to quickly cast "summon stairs." ...127 to dodge under the falling rocks.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Spirit of 70 wrote:
I just finished Neal Stephenson's The Diamond Age which explores the possibilities and dangers of nanotechnology. I really liked this book, but ultimately felt a bit frustrated by it as Stephenson takes big jumps in time, and ultimately leaves out a lot of important / interesting details as a result. It left me feeling like the book either should have been a series, or at least twice as long as it actually was. So, Snow Crash is still my current favorite from him, and I'll probably check out more of his work in the future, hoping for better.

I tried to read The Diamond Age once, and gave up on it. It had been recommended to me by several different people, but it just didn't click... does it get better later in the book?
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Adam
United States
Tempe
Arizona
flag msg tools
AaAaAaAaAaAaA! Oh no! You shanked my Jenga ship!
badge
"We are plain quiet folk and have no use for adventures. Nasty disturbing uncomfortable things! Make you late for dinner! I can't think what anybody sees in them."
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
No. In fact, I would say that the book gets progressively worse as the length and frequency of time jumps increase, and everything is brought to a conclusion that leaves too many dangling questions and too much feeling unresolved. A friend of mine said recently that Stephenson has trouble with his endings, and that was certainly apparent in The Diamond Age.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Caroline Berg
United States
Washington
flag msg tools
designer
badge
...124 to run fleeing from the mountain. ...125 to use a rope to climb the cliff. ...126 to quickly cast "summon stairs." ...127 to dodge under the falling rocks.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Yikes! Well... perhaps someday when I've run out of all other books I'll try again... but I've recently got three tasty books waiting for me at the library that I'll pick up in about half-an-hour while commuting home from work.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Clay Blankenship
United States
Owens Cross Roads
AL
flag msg tools
designer
badge
That's a moray!
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Spirit of 70 wrote:
No. In fact, I would say that the book gets progressively worse as the length and frequency of time jumps increase, and everything is brought to a conclusion that leaves too many dangling questions and too much feeling unresolved. A friend of mine said recently that Stephenson has trouble with his endings, and that was certainly apparent in The Diamond Age.


Diamond Age definitely has a bizarro ending. I think he gets better at wrapping things up in his later books. I would say REAMDE is the most "readable" (no pun intended) followed by Cryptonomicon. The Baroque Cycle is amazing but it is quite long.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Chris Abbott
Canada
GTA
of Confusion
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Just starting the Elric saga.

Elric of Melniboné (#1) almost finished

The Sailor on the Seas of Fate (#2) next up
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
True Blue Jon
United States
Vancouver
Washington
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I just finished Sorcerer's Son by Phyllis Eisenstein. I think it might be my favorite fantasy book that I've read so far.
6 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
William Hostman
United States
Alsea
OR
flag msg tools
designer
I've been Banished to Oregon... Gaming in Corvallis, living in Alsea... Need gamers willing to try new things...
badge
The Splattered Imperium
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Trying to wade through a Richard Castle book. (Forget which.)

Just having a hard time getting into it. Jamison isn't Rick... and it shows.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Caroline Berg
United States
Washington
flag msg tools
designer
badge
...124 to run fleeing from the mountain. ...125 to use a rope to climb the cliff. ...126 to quickly cast "summon stairs." ...127 to dodge under the falling rocks.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I've been reading a lot of non-fiction coding books... but I've been trying to fit in some fiction between them.

Right now I'm reading Parable of the Sower by Octavia E. Butler and I'm loving it so far. Loving it because the writing is amazing. The topic, unfortunately, is all too real - and is right up there with The Handmaid's Tale in terms of painting a picture of a scary future America that isn't - at least not yet.
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Shawn McCarthy
Canada
Calgary
AB
flag msg tools
designer
https://rpggeek.com/blog/6320
badge
Avatar
mb
Last two were:

Pretty good. You need to get into the WTNV aesthetic,
but no knowledge of the podcast is really required.
This one got me right in the feels. Molly's lived
a (hundred) heartbreaking life (lives).
6 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
¡dn ʇǝƃ ʇ,uɐɔ ı puɐ uǝllɐɟ ǝʌ,ı
Canada
Chestermere
Alberta
flag msg tools
Life lesson: Hamsters are NOT diswasher safe.
badge
There are 10 types of people-- those who understand binary, and those who don't.
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
The Weirdness: A Novel



A mash-up of modern with supernatural elements.
It was strange but it wasn't bizzare. Weird in a good way.

A pretty quick and easy read. Some swearing and some sex-- a bit of something for everyone.
Plus a waving Chinese cat.
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Andy Leighton
England
Peterborough
Unspecified
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
It seems that it has been ages since I last updated my reads here - hot summer, holidays, cons and beer festival have intervened. So I will just provide a list. If you want to know about a particular title please ask.

Semiosis by Sue Burke.
Matryoshka by Ricardo Pinto.
Marrow Redux by Robert Reed
Cthulhu Fhtagn! edited by Ross E. Lockhart
Infinity Wars edited by Jonathan Strahan
Alien Morning by Rick Wilber
Mammoth Book of Cthulhu edited by Paula Gunn
Bird Box by Josh Malerman
Raven Strategem by Yoon Ha Lee
Shelter by Dave Hutchinson
Haven by Adam Roberts
Child of Time by George Mann
The Sideways Door by R J Carter
The Albino's Dancer by Dale Smith
Deus Le Volt by Jon De Burg Miller
Whispers From The Abyss edited by Kat Rocha
Binary Storm by Christopher Hinz
Infinity's End edited by Jonathan Strahan
The Kindly Ones by Melissa Scott
Clade by James Bradley
Innsmouth Nightmares edited by Lois H Gresh
The Lake Boy by Adam Roberts
Ghost Frequences by Gary Gibson
Exit West by Mohsin Hamid
The Weather of Versimmon by Matthew Griffiths
Something Changed and Parallel Lives edited by Simon Guerrier - two Bernice Summerfield collections (one of novellas)


6 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Adam
United States
Tempe
Arizona
flag msg tools
AaAaAaAaAaAaA! Oh no! You shanked my Jenga ship!
badge
"We are plain quiet folk and have no use for adventures. Nasty disturbing uncomfortable things! Make you late for dinner! I can't think what anybody sees in them."
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I'm jealous, Andy! I wish I had those sorts of interruptions!

Also, I just finished Rumo and His Miraculous Adventures by Walter Moers, who is probably best known for The 13 and 1/2 lives of Captain Blue Bear. This is another story set in the fictional world of Zamonia, which is a heavily fantasy infused pre-historic (As in Conan prehistory, not actual prehistory) Earth. Moers is quite a playful writer, and one of the central stunts he pulls in this book is making his protagonist a great deal less interesting than all of the supporting characters. The book works quite well in spite of it, and was an enjoyable read, but I wish he'd done a little more with Rumo than making him a fantastically good combatant suffering from a bad case of true love. He's reticent almost to the point of muteness, something even the other characters often comment on, and the running joke wears thin by the time the story reaches its conclusion. Fortunately, the book often jumps perspective and engages in a number of entertaining digressions, which keeps it from collapsing under the weight of the central conceit. This is worth checking out if you're a fan of playful, humorous fantasy that doesn't try to be laugh-out-loud funny.
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Andy Leighton
England
Peterborough
Unspecified
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
This weeks reading

Irontown Blues by John Varley. Science Fiction. This is a long awaited return to Varley's Eight Worlds series. It is a loose sequel to The Steel Beach and The Golden Globe. The two main narrators in the story are Chris Bach, who styles himself as a noir-ish detective, and his enhanced dog sidekick called Sherlock.

The Calculating Stars by May Robinetter Kowal. Science Fiction. In 1952 a meteorite falls to earth and obliterates most of the eastern seaboard of the USA (killing nearly all the government). Dr Elma York works out that this will result in a climatic cataclysm and will wipe out humanity. This novel tells of an accelerated (lower-tech) space program and the fight of Elma (and others) to be considered astronauts alongside men.

Resurrection Man by Sean Stewart. Fantasy. Magic has started to seep back into the world some time after WW2. Dante Ratkay is living a fairly aimless life, by choice, he knows that he may have a power within him but he refuses to engage with it. However when his half-brother uncovers Dante's corpse back at the family home Dante has to face up to reality and his family must deal with their history.

The Stones Are Singing by RB Russell. Atmospheric weird tale set in Venice. It is very artfully done as the events are mostly extremely mundane and innocuous on their own but become far more ominous when intertwined with the rest.

Dark Satanic Mills edited by Steve Shaw. British horror anthology. A wide variety of stories in a number of different horror styles.

6 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Kevin
msg tools
badge
Avatar
Read the entire run of vol. 1 of [url=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Authority_(comics)]The Authority[/url]. A bit dated but still fun.

Picked back up an omnibus edition of The Black Company. I find the story a little hard to follow, but it's still entertaining.
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Ben Vincent
United States
Ridgefield
Washington
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I recently finished Once an Eagle, by Anton Myrer. Currently reading Ascend Online, by Luke Chmilenko. I will finish that tonight. After that, I'll either start the sequel, or read Hell Divers, by Nicholas Sansbury Smith.
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Shawn McCarthy
Canada
Calgary
AB
flag msg tools
designer
https://rpggeek.com/blog/6320
badge
Avatar
mb
Whenever I need a fix for bite sized gaming ideas, I grab some graphic novels to read on the bus.
I just flipped the last page of Wicked & Divine collection #3 and next up is JC Hellblazer; I believe it’s the Deep Cuts collection.
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Eric Dodd
New Zealand
Martinborough
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Limited Access - Wellycon XI - Back 5th June 2018
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Finished Whispers Under Ground by Ben Aaronovitch, the third in his Peter Grant series. This is Urban Fantasy where the protagonist is a detective in a magical branch of London's Metropolitan Police. It's pretty grounded, and the magic that Grant can use is fairly limited. There are increasing numbers of magical communities and entities being discovered to make the police work more complicated. The ongoing story line from the two previous books involves a criminal sorcerer staying one step ahead of the police. Amusing and an easy read, and the real world setting and consequences keeps the story grounded.

Graphic novels recently read include:

Paper Girls 1-3
Giant Days 1-5
Cardboard
The Rabbi's Cat 1 & 2
Lewis & Clark
6 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Andy Leighton
England
Peterborough
Unspecified
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
This week's reading

Salvation by Peter F. Hamilton. Science fiction. First of a new series. Set in 2204, and mankind discovers and abandoned alien spaceship 90ly from Earth. A team of people, all of whom have their own agendas, are sent to find out if it is a threat. Most of the book is developing the back stories of this team and revealing a lot of detail about Earth and a race of aliens that are on friendly terms.

The Wild Dead by Carrie Vaughn. Science fiction - a post-apocalyptic murder-mystery. A follow up to Bannerless. Enid of Haven is an investigator and she has a new trainee partner. They are called in to mediate a dispute over an old building in a far-flung settlement on the Coast Road. All very straightforward until the body of a young woman is discovered in the marshland - and what is more unusual the woman does not come from the Coast Road.

The Green Man's Heir by Juliet E. McKenna. Contemporary fantasy set in and around The Peak District. Daniel Mackmain is a carpenter and wood-carver and also the son of a dryad and human. His heritage allows him to see and experience a hidden world that normal people can't. When he stumbles on the scene of a murder and finds a local dryad is observing events he becomes entangled with the investigations and has to deal with more than one supernatural entity.

Summerland by Hannu Rajaniemi. SF/Fantasy but really more of an espionage thriller in an alternate 1938 where the spirit world plays a major part with various tech like an ectophone to communicate with those in Summerland the luxurious metropolis for the recently dead – well at least those that have a ticket, those that don't just fade away.

Rotherweird by Andrew Caldecott. Fantasy. Rotherweird is a town and valley cut off from the rest of England - almost physically, but definitely socially and psycho-geographically - by some event that happened 400 years ago. It has a somewhat sub-Gormenghast baroqueness to it mixed up with a slice of acid-tinged Portmerion. Whilst there are a few excellent set-pieces (the coracle racing for example) it takes a long time for the bigger picture to emerge and in the end I felt it was a bit too rambling and overstayed its welcome. I will not be reading the other books in the series.
7 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
[1]  Prev «  103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107  Next »  [107] | 
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.